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TrendForce updates list for top 5 smartphone manufacturers as of Q3 2015

TrendForce updates list for top 5 smartphone manufacturers as of Q3 2015
TrendForce updates list for top 5 smartphone manufacturers as of Q3 2015
The analytics firm is reporting a significant global sales growth of 9.1 percent for a total of 332 million mobile devices.

TrendForce has published its list of top smartphone manufacturers based solely on global sales volume for this third quarter. Accordingly, sales have risen by almost 9.1 percent from 305.09 million units to 332.71 million units. It's worth noting that many major manufacturers announced their respective flagship devices during this period including the Samsung Galaxy Note 5, Huawei Mate S, and the Sony Xperia Z5.

Meanwhile, China continues to see growth as smartphone sales are up from 128.5 million in Q2 2015 to 149.5 million in Q3 2015 for a considerable increase of 16.3 percent. The top 5 brands remain unchanged from Xiaomi, Huawei, Lenovo, TCL, and Oppo - in that order.

Worldwide sales, however, paint a different picture as Samsung and Apple still top the list as the world's largest smartphone manufacturers in first and second place, respectively. Huawei is still third, though the company is picking up steam as its market share has increased from 7.5 percent to 8.4 percent. In comparison, Samsung and Apple lost market share by 2.1 percent and 1.7 percent, respectively. Xiaomi and Lenovo bring up the rear at fourth and fifth place, respectively.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 10 > TrendForce updates list for top 5 smartphone manufacturers as of Q3 2015
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-10-15 (Update: 2015-10-15)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.