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The Aorus X9 holds dual GTX 1070 in SLI and a low-profile mechanical keyboard in a slim 17.3-inch chassis

The new Aorus X9, a 17.3-inch gaming laptop in a slim chassis. (Source: Aorus)
The new Aorus X9, a 17.3-inch gaming laptop in a slim chassis. (Source: Aorus)
Aorus have announced their new X9 gaming laptop, with aggressive looks, SLI graphics, and a low-profile mechanical keyboard, all in a slim 17.3-inch chassis. Two screen options provide either 120 Hz refresh rate or 100 percent AdobeRGB depending on preference.

Edit: Our review of the Aorus X9 is now live on the website, please click here to view it.

Aorus, a subsidiary of Gigabyte, are well known for producing well-constructed, powerful, thin — and loud — gaming laptops. Today they expand their product portfolio by announcing the Aorus X9, a 17.3-inch gaming laptop which has its sights set on a few records.

Aorus claims that the X9 is the world’s thinnest 17.3-inch laptop with a mechanical keyboard, that it is the world slimmest 17.3-inch laptop with GTX 1070s in SLI, and that it is the world’s first 17.3-inch laptop with quad cooling fans. However, Aorus does like to make claims based on a technicality, such as when they touted the X3 as the most powerful 13.9-inch laptop even though this is an unusual screen size which it shared with few competitors (such as the Lenovo Yoga 910 convertible.)

Even if you put those claims aside, the X9 is an impressive notebook, with dual woofers to accompany two speakers, and a 3840x2160 IPS display which achieves 100% of AdobeRGB (something which mobile video and photo editors will appreciate). A 2560 x 1440 resolution 120 Hz WVA panel with a reported 5ms response time is also available for those who would prefer buttery smooth frame rates over the best color accuracy. Regardless of which panel you choose, it will have been calibrated and certified from the factory.

For storage, there is space for two M.2 NVMe drives and a single 2.5-inch bay for either a SATA SSD, or more likely, a hard drive with enough space to fit a 2 TB part. Four user accessible memory slots allow up to 64 GB of DDR4 RAM. There is a 10-stage fan control, but since earlier models were known to run quite hot, and these are some power hungry parts inside a slim chassis, we wouldn’t be surprised if you were turning the fans all the way up when under heavy load.

External measurements are 428 X 314 X 23.5-30.5 mm (16.9 x 12.4 x 0.9-1.18 inches) W x D x H, and weight is a fairly-portable-for-the-size 3.6 kg (7.9lb). The Aorus X9 will be available later this month and retails for either US$3649 or US$3799 in the United States depending on which of the two launch configurations you select.

Aorus X9-KL4K4MAorus X9-KL4K5M
ProcessorIntel i7-7820HK 2.9/3.9 GHz 4C/8T with overclockingIntel i7-7820HK 2.9/3.9 GHz 4C/8T with overclocking
Memory2 x 16 GB DDR4-24002 x 16 GB DDR4-2400
GraphicsNVIDIA GTX 1070 SLINVIDIA GTX 1070 SLI
Screen17.3-inch 3840x2160 IPS 100% AdobeRGB 17.3-inch 3840x2160 IPS 100% AdobeRGB 
SSD1 x 512 GB M.2 NVMe2 x 512 GB M.2 NVMe
HDD1 x 1000 GB 2.5-inch-
PriceUS$3649US$3799



The Aorus X9 has enough lights to guide planes in for a landing. (Source: Aorus)
The Aorus X9 has enough lights to guide planes in for a landing. (Source: Aorus)
The Aorus X9 has a low-profile mechanical keyboard. (Source: Aorus)
The Aorus X9 has a low-profile mechanical keyboard. (Source: Aorus)
An interesting intake grill design on the underside of the Aorus X9. (Source: Aorus)
An interesting intake grill design on the underside of the Aorus X9. (Source: Aorus)

Source(s)

Aorus product page

Aorus press material

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 10 > The Aorus X9 holds dual GTX 1070 in SLI and a low-profile mechanical keyboard in a slim 17.3-inch chassis
Craig Ward, 2017-10-19 (Update: 2017-10-23)
Craig Ward
Craig Ward - News Editor
I grew up in a family surrounded by technology, starting with my father loading up games for me on a Commodore 64, and later on a 486. In the late 90's and early 00's I started learning how to tinker with Windows, while also playing around with Linux distributions, both of which gave me an interest for learning how to make software do what you want it to do, and modifying settings that aren't normally user accessible. After this I started building my own computers, and tearing laptops apart, which gave me an insight into hardware and how it works in a complete system. Now keeping up with the latest in hardware and software news is a passion of mine.