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Sharp to invest over $800 million USD in OLED production

Sharp to invest over $800 million USD in OLED production
Sharp to invest over $800 million USD in OLED production
The trend towards OLED is ramping up with Sharp, JDI, LG, Foxconn, and SDP all devoting more resources to large-scale OLED manufacturing.

Aside from Japan Display Inc. (JDI) and LG, Sharp will also hasten its production plans on OLED panels as the Japanese manufacturer will purportedly cooperate with Foxconn to invest $864 million USD in an OLED manufacturing line in Zhengzhou, China. The DigiTimes source is claiming that full-scale production is expected to begin by 2019, which would unfortunately be much too late for the 10th anniversary of the launch of the very first iPhone. The next major iPhone refresh, for example, has been heavily rumored to carry an OLED panel.

Apple will likely rely on Samsung for most of its OLED demand in the near future should any iPhone, iPad, or Watch models have OLED displays. Supplies will continue to be very limited until more manufacturers have the proper large-scale production lines. Another Japanese panel manufacturer called Sakai Display Products (SDP) is expected to begin mass manufacturing of OLED panels by 2018 assuming no major hurdles.

When compared to IPS panels, OLED offers vastly superior contrast levels and a potentially wider color gamut. Its design is also more flexible than an equivalent IPS screen for better compatibility with curved or foldable consumer electronics.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 01 > Sharp to invest over $800 million USD in OLED production
Allen Ngo, 2017-01-12 (Update: 2017-01-12)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.