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Science Channel shows how a Gigabyte Aero 15 laptop is made

Science Channel shows how a Gigabyte Aero 15 laptop is made (Source: Science Channel)
Science Channel shows how a Gigabyte Aero 15 laptop is made (Source: Science Channel)
Watch a quick 5-minute video following the production, assembly, and diagnostics of the Gigabyte laptop from start to finish.

How It's Made is a long-running TV series aiming to show viewers the various behind-the-scenes processes of manufacturing everyday items. After more than 31 seasons, the program finally had a segment on the manufacturing of laptops or, more specifically, the 15.6-inch Gigabyte Aero 15 laptop.

As shown by the video below, the short segment follows the assembly of the Taiwanese laptop from start to finish. The etching of the PCB and core components are handled by a machine before the chassis components are assembled by hand. Everything from the fans, heat pipes, LCD, webcam, antenna, WiFi, RAM, SSD, and even battery are manually installed.

Once fully assembled, specialized diagnostics software tests the components, keyboard, and display for operability.

Granted, other OEMs are likely to assemble their laptops differently especially for unibody chassis designs that don't have removable bottom plates. This is still a neat inside look at how one particular laptop model is made nonetheless. The Aero 15 has become one of Gigabyte's most successful laptops to date and it currently tops our list of the ten best lightweight gaming laptops available.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2019 02 > Science Channel shows how a Gigabyte Aero 15 laptop is made
Allen Ngo, 2019-02-18 (Update: 2019-02-18)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.