Notebookcheck

Samsung confirms manufacturing defects on initial Galaxy S7 Active batches

Samsung confirms manufacturing defects on early Galaxy S7 Active batches
Samsung confirms manufacturing defects on early Galaxy S7 Active batches
Early adopters of the rugged Galaxy S7 Active may find that their new smartphones may not be waterproof at all.

The Galaxy S7 has indubitably been a success for Samsung. Both the standard Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge have been selling well all over the world and the Galaxy S7 Active has been available in the U.S. for at least a few weeks. It is so far an AT&T exclusive, so the model may not yet be available in some European regions.

As the name of the model suggests, the S7 Active is for those who live an active outdoor lifestyle where the extremely delicate build of a standard smartphone would be too risky to carry. Thus, the design of the S7 Active is more robust and with better resistance against the elements. According to Consumer Reports, however, an S7 Active test model actually failed an immersion test due to a manufacturing defect in the seal. This is compared to the Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge, both of which are also water resistant and passed the same immersion tests from Consumer Reports.

While a single test is absolutely not representative of all units produced thus far, Samsung has admitted that there was a manufacturing problem on early batches of the S7 Active and claims that the issue has now been resolved. The manufacturer is promising free repairs and guaranteed waterproofing for those early adopters who may have a faulty unit.

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team! Indian citizens welcome!

Currently wanted: 
News and Editorial Editor - Details here

Source(s)

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 07 > Samsung confirms manufacturing defects on initial Galaxy S7 Active batches
Benjamin Herzig/ Allen Ngo, 2016-07-27 (Update: 2016-07-27)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.