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Samsung Galaxy Tab A 7.0 2016 now available

Samsung Galaxy Tab A 7.0 2016 now available
Samsung Galaxy Tab A 7.0 2016 now available
The Galaxy Tab A 7.0 is an affordable 7-inch tablet for a low starting price of 170 Euros.

Available starting today in most European regions, the Galaxy Tab A 7.0 2016 Edition carries a 7-inch HD resolution (1280 x 800) display and measures just 186.9 x 108.8 x 8.7 mm with a weight of 283 grams. Internal storage tops out at 8 GB and the system runs Android 5.1 Lollipop as standard. There is no word on potential updates to Android 6.0 Marshmallow, but the chances of an official update are unlikely given the budget class of the device. Color options include Black and White.

The core hardware of the tablet is an unspecified 1.3 GHz quad-core SoC with 1.5 GB RAM and MicroSD support up to 200 GB. Rear and front cameras are 5 MP and 2 MP, respectively.

Communication and interfaces include 802.11 b/g/n (2.4 GHz only), Wi-Fi Direct, Bluetooth 4.0, and a USB 2.0 port. The internal 4000 mAh battery is rated for up to 9 hours of video playback.

The Galaxy Tab A 7.0 2016 follows on the footsteps of the much older Galaxy Tab 3 7.0 that launched three years ago with weaker hardware and a higher starting price of just under 200 Euros. The Samsung tablet competes against the Nexus 7 2013, which is still one of the best Android tablets available for the screen size and price. Amazon recently jumped several spots to become one of the world's largest tablet providers with its similar lineup of very inexpensive offerings.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 03 > Samsung Galaxy Tab A 7.0 2016 now available
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-03-15 (Update: 2016-03-15)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.