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Samsung Galaxy S7 may ship with unibody Magnesium alloy chassis

Samsung Galaxy S7 may ship with unibody Magnesium alloy chassis
Samsung Galaxy S7 may ship with unibody Magnesium alloy chassis
LG and Samsung are said to be investing in a lighter and stronger type of Magnesium alloy.

All major smartphone makers have at least one expensive flagship series to represent the company's pinnacle of design and hardware technology. Many of these models tend to carry elegant aluminum alloy cases as they are lightweight, more durable, and flashier compared to standard plastics.

According to media reports from South Korea, LG and Samsung are both gearing up for the next generation of flagship smartphones by utilizing a specific type of Magnesium alloy. Magnesium is one of the lightest common metals in the industry (Density: 1.74 kg/dm3) and its toughness and corrosion resistance can be improved with the addition of Zinc and Manganese, respectively.

The same reports have not made it clear if Samsung will introduce the new chassis as part of the Galaxy S7 or if it will come at a later date instead. The Galaxy S7 is rumored for two separate configurations later this year: One with a Snapdragon 820 SoC and the other with Samsung's own Exynos 8990 (Exynos M1) SoC. A supposed pre-production model was recently spotted on Geekbench as two separate entries with either 3 GB RAM or 4 GB RAM.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 09 > Samsung Galaxy S7 may ship with unibody Magnesium alloy chassis
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-09-21 (Update: 2015-09-21)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.