Notebookcheck

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 images leak ahead of August 2nd Unpacked event

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 images leak ahead of August 2nd Unpacked event
Samsung Galaxy Note 7 images leak ahead of August 2nd Unpacked event
Pictures suggest a 5.7-inch display with curved edges and a watertight chassis not unlike the Galaxy S7.

It's almost guaranteed that Samsung will unveil the Galaxy Note 7 on August 2nd as the direct successor to the Galaxy Note 5. Rumors and leaks about the Note 7 have been rampant all year long including the "Note 6" name skip to avoid confusion amongst customers and to standardize its product range. The Unpacked event will start at 11:00 EDT in New York with concurrent Unpacked events at 17:00 in Rio de Janerio and London. The events will also be broadcast live over the Internet.

Working units of the Galaxy Note 7 are supposedly already on the hands of bloggers and press. Based on these images and sources, The Note 7 may have a level of water resistance similar to the Galaxy S7 series. Other core features as leaked by @evLeaks include a 5.7-inch QHD display, Snapdragon 820/821 SoC, 4 to 6 GB RAM, up to 256 GB UFS eMMC, and an Exynos 8893 SoC depending on region. There is another possibility that the smartphone could be one of the first to include both fast UFS storage and a MicroSD slot.

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team! Indian citizens welcome!

Currently wanted: 
News and Editorial Editor - Details here

Source(s)

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 07 > Samsung Galaxy Note 7 images leak ahead of August 2nd Unpacked event
Alexander Fagot/ Allen Ngo, 2016-07-18 (Update: 2016-07-18)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.