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Samsung Galaxy Note 5 successor renders leak online

Samsung Galaxy Note 5 successor renders leak online
Samsung Galaxy Note 5 successor renders leak online
Official reveal date purportedly set for August according to latest rumors.

Evan Blass of @evleaks has announced via his Twitter that the next Galaxy Note launch is just two months away when Samsung is expected to make the official announcement around the same time that the next Apple iPhone will be made available.

Coinciding with the leak are renderings and even a short video of the design showing the alleged phablet from multiple angles. Of course, none of the renderings are official, so these should definitely be taken with a grain of salt.

Previous rumors suggest that the Galaxy Note 5 successor will skip the "Note 6" name and jump straight to "Note 7" to be numerically in line with the Galaxy S7 and the eventual iPhone 7. At least two models or SKUs are expected with one being slightly less powerful and more affordable. The newly leaked images suggest a metal back and curved glass front with USB Type-C and the usual stylus slot. There appears to be no dual cameras for the Note 5 successor whereas the iPhone 7 Plus is anticipated to have two cameras on the back.

The renderings claim dimensions of 153.5 x 73.9 x 7.9 mm. Rumored specifications include a Snapdragon 823 SoC or Exynos 8890 depending on the region, up to 6 GB RAM, 4000 mAh battery, and a 5.8-inch Super AMOLED QHD panel.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 06 > Samsung Galaxy Note 5 successor renders leak online
Alexander Fagot/ Allen Ngo, 2016-06- 5 (Update: 2016-06- 5)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.