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Samsung Galaxy Note 7 makes an appearance on GeekBench

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 makes an appearance on GeekBench
Samsung Galaxy Note 7 makes an appearance on GeekBench
Both the Exynos 8890 model and its Snapdragon 820 variant are listed on Geekbench complete with single-core and multi-core scores.

Just a few weeks before its official reveal, the next Galaxy Note phablet has already appeared on the Geekbench database with some new hardware info. Accordingly, Samsung will use a higher-clocked Exynos 8890 SoC running at 1.79 GHz with 4 GB RAM for final single-core and multi-core scores of 2300 and 8110 points, respectively.

Another variant of the Galaxy Note has also been spotted with the Snapdragon 820 SoC clocked at 1.59 GHz, which will likely be the model for North American and Chinese users compared to the Exynos European model above. Previous rumors claimed that Qualcomm would be providing a higher-clocked Snapdragon 821/823 for the next Galaxy Note, but this latest entry from Geekbench is saying otherwise. Thus, single-core and multi-core Geekbench scores are lower at 2330 and 5360 points, respectively. All other specifications appear equal including the 4 GB of RAM.

Samsung will be hosting a press event for the Galaxy Note 7 and potentially other devices as well this August 2nd. The phablet is expected to borrow heavily from the lauded Galaxy S7 series including the potential for a dustproof and waterproof chassis.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 07 > Samsung Galaxy Note 7 makes an appearance on GeekBench
Alexander Fagot/ Allen Ngo, 2016-07-15 (Update: 2016-07-15)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.