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Upcoming Qualcomm Snapdragon 821 will not supplant the Snapdragon 820

Upcoming Qualcomm Snapdragon 821 will not supplant the Snapdragon 820
Upcoming Qualcomm Snapdragon 821 will not supplant the Snapdragon 820
Instead, the Snapdragon 821 will co-exist with the Snapdragon 820. Raw performance gain will be about 10 percent due to its faster clock rate.

Qualcomm has officially announced the new Snapdragon 821 SoC as the newest member of the Snapdragon 800 family. The processor appeared in benchmark databases just a few weeks ago and is intended to bridge the release gap between the Snapdragon 820 and the next eventual "true" successor. Thus, the 821 is not a completely new SoC and is more of a minor update to the Snapdragon 820.

The 821 is almost identical to the 820 including its integrated X12 LTE modem capable of transfer rates of up to 600 MB/s and compatibility with Ultra HD Voice for better call quality. The biggest difference between them will the increase in core clock rate from 2.1 GHz to 2.4 GHz for a claimed performance increase of about 10 percent.

Smartphones with the Snapdragon 821 have not yet been announced, but potential candidates may include the upcoming Nexus smartphones and the Asus Zenfone 3. The current Snapdragon 820 is the powerhouse for most flagship Android devices of 2016 including the HTC 10 and the LG G5. The Exynos 8890, however, carries a measurable lead in raw performance power.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 07 > Upcoming Qualcomm Snapdragon 821 will not supplant the Snapdragon 820
Benjamin Herzig/ Allen Ngo, 2016-07-15 (Update: 2016-07-16)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.