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Samsung Galaxy J5 2016 leaks on GFXBench

Samsung Galaxy J5 2016 leaks on GFXBench
Samsung Galaxy J5 2016 leaks on GFXBench
A new entry in the GFXBench database claims to be the unannounced 5.2-inch Samsung Galaxy J5.

The supposed Samsung Galaxy J5 2016 appeared just last week on the tracking service Zauba.com with the model name SM-J510. For comparison, the current Galaxy J5 2015 sports the model name SM-J500, so the mystery SM-J510 is expected to be either the full successor to the J5 2015 or a small update at the very least. Now, however, a new entry in GFXBench has appeared with the same SM-J510 model name complete with some core specifications and numbers.

According to the source, the new Galaxy J5 will carry a larger 5.2-inch Super AMOLED touchscreen with a resolution of 1280 x 720 pixels. The current Galaxy J5 uses a slightly smaller 5-inch Super AMOLED panel, though at the same 720p resolution for a higher PPI. Other hardware features include the Snapdragon 410 SoC, Adreno 306 GPU, 2 GB RAM, and 16 GB eMMC. There may be no significant changes coming to the cameras, however, as the new Galaxy J5 looks to have the same rear 13 MP and front 5 MP cameras as its predecessor as far as we can tell from the GFXBench listing.

The South Korean manufacturer recently unveiled the Galaxy J1 and the updated Galaxy A series for the new year. It's only a matter time before both the Galaxy J5 and Galaxy S6 successors are officially unveiled as well as we move closer to Mobile World Conference 2016.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 01 > Samsung Galaxy J5 2016 leaks on GFXBench
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-01-19 (Update: 2016-01-20)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.