Notebookcheck

Qualcomm Snapdragon 8180 for Windows 10 on ARM shows up on Geekbench

The Snapdragon 8180/1000 is said to offer a 15W TDP envelope. (Source: Qualcomm)
The Snapdragon 8180/1000 is said to offer a 15W TDP envelope. (Source: Qualcomm)
A Geekbench entry has surfaced for a new Qualcomm SoC and a closer examination reveals that this is indeed the Snapdragon 8180 SoC that was rumored to be in development exclusively for Windows 10 on ARM notebooks. The Snapdragon 8180 was originally referred to as the Snapdragon 1000 and it offers a higher 15W TDP envelope to power typical mainstream computing tasks. The initial benchmark scores, however, are not very convincing.

Qualcomm announced the Snapdragon 850 SoC for Windows 10 on ARM PCs at Computex 2018 but we have been hearing rumors about a possible Snapdragon 1000 in the works. Now, a Geekbench listing of what is supposedly the Snapdragon 1000 has surfaced implying that internal benchmarking of this chip could have started. 

The Geekbench listing shows a Qualcomm MTP on a PC with 8 GB RAM running Windows 10 Home 32-bit. While the CPU model is not directly evident, the BIOS listing (highlighted in green) shows the reference 'SC8180' implying this could indeed be Snapdragon 1000 aka 8180. Earlier this week, we reported that Qualcomm is likely to opt for a new nomenclature to differentiate its smartphone and Windows 10 on ARM offerings. The next Snapdragon SoC for smartphones is already in the hands of OEMs and is said to go by the name 'SM8150' while the ARM notebook offering is apparently being referred to as the 'SCX8180'. The Snapdragon 8180, which was earlier internally referred to as the 'SDM1000', is said to be an octa-core 15W TDP chip based on a modified ARM Cortex A75 or A76 architecture so as to be more capable for typical Windows workflows, which the current crop of Snapdragon SoCs don't particularly excel at.

In this particular benchmark, we see that the SoC has posted a single-core score of 1392 and a multi-core score of 4286. Even while considering the fact that these are early figures, honestly, they are not that great. A 10W quad-core Pentium Silver J5005 (2113 single-core and 6368 multi-core) or even the 6W dual-core Intel Pentium Gold 4415Y used in the Microsoft Surface Go (2064 single-core and 4117 multi-core) shows nearly 1.5x more performance. This again, serves to illustrate the shortcomings of benchmarks run under emulation as we've outlined in our Windows 10 on ARM opinion piece earlier. Unless native ARM64 benchmarks are developed, evaluating Qualcomm's offerings with respect to traditional x86 ULV CPUs is akin to an apples to oranges comparison. That said, the Snapdragon 8180 does post significantly higher scores than the Snapdragon 835 used in the Asus NovaGo TP370QL (911 single-core and 3278 multi-core).

The Snapdragon 8180 is expected to be announced during CES 2019 and OEMs such as Asus, Dell, HP, and Lenovo are already hard at work to release new Windows 10 on ARM devices powered by the new SoC next year.

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team! Especially English native speakers welcome!

Currently wanted: 
News and Editorial Editor - Details here

Geekbench listing of the Snapdragon 1000. Note the SC8180 highlighted in green. (Source: Winfuture)
Geekbench listing of the Snapdragon 1000. Note the SC8180 highlighted in green. (Source: Winfuture)

Source(s)

Winfuture (German)

+ Show Press Release
Read all 2 comments / answer
static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2018 08 > Qualcomm Snapdragon 8180 for Windows 10 on ARM shows up on Geekbench
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2018-08-29 (Update: 2018-08-30)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam - News Editor
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.