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Qualcomm starts sampling next-gen Snapdragon SoCs to OEMs

The next generation Snapdragon SoCs are already being sampled to OEMs. (Source: Gizmochina)
The next generation Snapdragon SoCs are already being sampled to OEMs. (Source: Gizmochina)
The next generation Qualcomm Snapdragon SoCs are being sampled to OEMs according to Qualcomm. The upcoming Snapdragon Mobile Platform will be built on the 7nm process and will work together with the Snapdragon X50 5G modem to power the next generation of mobile devices as we head into 2019.

Qualcomm has started seeding the next generation Snapdragon Mobile Platform to OEMs for testing and evaluation in course for an official unveiling in Q4 2018. The new Snapdragon SoC will be built on a 7nm process, possibly by TSMC, and will work best with the Qualcomm Snapdragon X50 5G modem. 5G rollout is expected to begin towards the end of this year and Qualcomm's new Mobile Platform is expected to be a front-runner in the transition to 5G.

Qualcomm President Cristiano Amon stated,

We are very pleased to be working with OEMs, operators, infrastructure vendors, and standards bodies across the world, and are on track to help launch the first 5G mobile hotspots by the end of 2018, and smartphones using our next-generation mobile platform in the first half of 2019."

We've not heard much about Qualcomm's plans for the next generation Snapdragon Mobile Platform apart from the fact that it will be based on a 7nm process. There have been whispers about a new Razer Phone successor in the works, which will apparently sport the Snapdragon 855. However, word on the street is that Qualcomm might opt for a new nomenclature from this generation apparently referred to as SDM8150 in order to distinguish smartphone SoCs from those designed for Windows 10 on ARM notebooks. 

Qualcomm is bullish on making headway in the 5G space by offering the first 5G NR-ready modem in the Snapdragon X50. Field testing of the Snapdragon X50 is underway with major carriers across the world and 5G services are slated to debut in the US by end of this year. Recently, the company also unveiled compatible antennas for the Snapdragon X50 that can operate in the mmWave and sub-6 GHz frequencies. 

The launch of a new Snapdragon SoC towards the end of the year is always a bit irksome for those looking to buy flagship Android devices between Q3 to Q4. This year, Google will be launching the new Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL in October, LG is expected to launch the V40 ThinQ sometime between October-November, and Sony is expected to reveal the Xperia XZ3 during IFA 2018. So, buyers will essentially be left with an older chipset through the major part of next year. #FirstWorldProblems.

Most smartphone vendors, however, will be announcing new refreshes of flagships towards MWC 2019 so it will still be a while before a new SoC reaches our hands. MediaTek, Qualcomm's main competitor in the budget smartphone space, is also expected to rollout 7nm SoCs towards the end of this year.

Nevertheless, it will be interesting to see what improvements a 7nm chip brings to the table in terms of compute and power efficiency. We should be getting some tidbits of information on benchmarking sites as OEMs test the new SoC so do watch out for those.

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Source(s)

Qualcomm (PR Newswire)

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2018 08 > Qualcomm starts sampling next-gen Snapdragon SoCs to OEMs
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2018-08-22 (Update: 2018-08-22)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam - News Editor
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.