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Pre-orders for the Vaio Z Canvas to start soon in North America

Pre-orders for the Vaio Z Canvas to start soon in North America
Pre-orders for the Vaio Z Canvas to start soon in North America
The Vaio Z Canvas is looking to steal the spotlight from Microsoft's Surface Pro tablets. Pre-orders for the 12.3-inch convertible will begin soon for the equivalent of 1850 Euros.

As reported earlier this year, Vaio is making a comeback to the notebook/convertible market with the Vaio Z Canvas VJZ12AX. The 12.3-inch convertible is expected to launch as early as October 5 in Brazil and North America with pre-orders beginning soon.

The Windows 10-based convertible will carry an uncommon resolution of 2560 x 1704 pixels paired with a powerful quad-core i7-4770HQ CPU and integrated Intel Iris Pro Graphics 5200. Storage options include PCIe SSD or M.2 and a stylus will also be included. Vaio appears to be aiming straight for the Surface Pro crowd based on these core specifications.

In Japan, the Vaio Z Canvas will start at just under 250000 Yen or about 1850 Euros. As for its US price, the manufacturer had mentioned a starting price of $2200 USD in an earlier press release. As usual, expect our full review on the device in the coming weeks when units are finally available.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 09 > Pre-orders for the Vaio Z Canvas to start soon in North America
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-09-15 (Update: 2015-09-15)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.