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Panasonic Toughpad FZ-Y1 Performance 20-inch tablet coming this December

Panasonic Toughpad FZ-Y1 Performance 20-inch tablet coming this December
Panasonic Toughpad FZ-Y1 Performance 20-inch tablet coming this December
The tablet is designed for 3D and CAD engineers and offers a 4K UHD 3840 x 2560 resolution display.

Announced in late July, the Toughpad FZ-Y1 is a 20-inch 4K rugged tablet designed for businesss and graphic designers. The "portable" includes dedicated a dedicated GPU and Windows 10 Pro for professional applications.

The Toughpad FZ-Y1 works as a tablet PC with a vPro-enabled Intel Core i7-5600U Broadwell CPU, AMD FirePro M5100 GPU, and 16 GB RAM. A 256 GB SSD is standard, but can be upgraded to 512 GB.

The massive 20-inch touchscreen offers UHD resolution (3840 x 2560 pixels), optional Bluetooth and IR-based pen, USB 3.0, Gigabit LAN, HDMI, mDP, and docking connector.

A higher-end model, called the FZ-Y1 Performance, will be available by the end of December for 5120 Euros. The high price comes with a 3-year warranty and includes on-call repairs within 96 hours in case of damage. The tablet is certified by leading software vendors such as Autodesk.

Our review on the smaller Toughpad FZ-B2 shows that build quality for the Toughpad series is one of the best for a professional tablet.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 10 > Panasonic Toughpad FZ-Y1 Performance 20-inch tablet coming this December
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-10-29 (Update: 2015-10-29)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.