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PC shipments in EMEA down 23 percent for Q3 2015

PC shipments in EMEA down 23 percent for Q3 2015
PC shipments in EMEA down 23 percent for Q3 2015
Latest data from IDC shows just 18.4 million PCs were sold last quarter in the regions.

PC shipments in Europe, Middle East, and Africa (EMEA) have decreased 23 percent as of Q3 2015 compared to the same quarter last year. IDC blames the currency turmoil and high existing levels of inventory as main reasons for the sluggish sales.

When looking specifically at each country, PC shipments are down across the board in Germany, France, and UK by 23.3 percent, 21.2 percent, and 11.1 percent, respectively. Spain experienced the smallest decline at just over 3.3 percent, though a decline nonetheless. Greece saw a drop of almost 50 percent compared to its neighboring countries.

Aside from sales, IDC has also ranked the Top five biggest desktop and notebook manufacturers in EMEA. All five brands, however, have experienced significant reductions in shipments. HP remains the largest manufacturer with shipments down by 17.1 percent followed by Lenovo, Dell, Acer, and Asus with shipments down by 20.1 percent, 11.3 percent, 38 percent, and 25.5 percent, respectively. Acer in particular is facing a rough time having shipped only 1.77 million PCs in Q3 2015 compared to 2.854 million PCs in Q3 2014. Numbers are practically guaranteed to improve by the end of Q4 2015, but the increase may not be enough to offset the extraordinarily low PC and tablet sales during the rest of the year.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 10 > PC shipments in EMEA down 23 percent for Q3 2015
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-10-17 (Update: 2015-10-17)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.