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PC market sees 21.6 percent decline in EMEA

PC market sees 21.6 percent decline in EMEA
PC market sees 21.6 percent decline in EMEA
A total of 17.2 million PCs were shipped to EMEA regions for Q2 2015.

Gartner recently posted unfavorable sales and shipments for portables during the first half of 2015, and now IDC is seeing something similar for EMEA. In total, PC shipments in these regions as of Q2 2015 have declined by 21.6 percent to just 17.207 million units compared to Q2 2014.

The huge drop can be attributed to the generally poor performance of the current worldwide PC market, though IDC analysts are also pointing fingers at overvalued stocks, exchange rate fluctuations, weakening Euro, and low demand from customers. In Western Europe, for example, sales of both desktops and laptops have fallen by 19.3 percent. Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries have also experienced a large 24.3 percent drop during the same period, while Middle Eastern and African countries saw an even larger 25.7 percent drop.

Poor PC sales are having a direct impact on the world's top manufacturers. Compared to the same period in 2014, Acer PC shipments in EMEA have fallen by 42.2 percent this past quarter to just 1.464 million units. Market share for the Taiwanese manufacturer has also tightened from 9.4 percent to 8.5 percent. Asus experienced a hit in shipments as well by 21.1 percent.

Other top manufacturers like Dell saw its collective desktop and notebook shipments decline by 11.7 percent. Both HP and Lenovo reported similar declines of 4.735 million to 3.921 million units and 3.947 million to 3.366 million units, respectively.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 07 > PC market sees 21.6 percent decline in EMEA
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-07-20 (Update: 2015-07-20)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.