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Worldwide semiconductor sales down 2.3 percent YoY

Worldwide semiconductor sales down 2.3 percent YoY
Worldwide semiconductor sales down 2.3 percent YoY
Slowing demand may be due to fluctuating currencies and factors outside of the still-growing tech industry.

Worldwide sales of semiconductors amounted to a total of $334.8 billion USD for the 2015 calendar year according to IT research and advisory firm Gartner. This represents a nominal decrease of 2.3 percent compared to 2014 with a total turnover drop of 0.5 percent from the top 25 largest semiconductor manufacturers. The rest of the market suffered revenue losses of about 6.9 percent.

Semiconductors facing slowing demand in key sectors

Gartner research vice president Andrew Norwood blames the slow demand on fluctuating currencies. He believes that the various sectors are still growing and developing even if the total revenue for the year is not reflective of an expanding market.

Intel remains the world's largest semiconductor manufacturer

Intel is sitting at the very top of the list for the 24th consecutive year according to Gartner. Nonetheless, the chipmaker declined 1.2 percent in global market share down to 15.4 percent as of 2015. Infineon Technologies saw the largest gain at 19.6 percent and was able to jump from 12th place to 9th place on Gartner's list of largest semiconductor manufacturers. The top 5 manufacturers (Intel, Samsung, SK Hynix, Qualcomm, and Micron) collectively take in about 40 percent of the total revenue of all semiconductor manufacturers according to the source.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 04 > Worldwide semiconductor sales down 2.3 percent YoY
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-04- 9 (Update: 2016-04-10)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.