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New AMD drivers hint at more Polaris GPUs to come

New AMD drivers hint at more Polaris GPUs to come
New AMD drivers hint at more Polaris GPUs to come
Code in the AMD graphics driver for Mac OS Sierra refers directly to unknown Polaris GPUs codenamed 'Polaris 10 XT2' and 'Polaris 12'.

The recent RX 490 rumors may not be all that implausible. Now that the new AMD drivers are finally available, users have discovered the names of two unknown GPUs in the graphics driver for Mac OS Sierra designated as Polaris 10 XT2 and Polaris 12. It can be deduced that both are not referring to the same GPU and since code referring to Vega GPUs can be found as well, it's possible that future Vega GPUs will run on largely the same drivers as existing Polaris GPUs.

Another possibility is that AMD may be developing new GPUs specifically for Apple hardware. While AMD GPUs are already available on certain MacBook SKUs, developing new Polaris hardware only for Apple devices seems unlikely for the chipmaker.

The Polaris architecture is AMD's current design for the Radeon 400 series and also serves as the basis for the recently released Playstation 4 Pro. The aggressive performance-per-Dollar of the latest Radeon GPUs has boosted AMD's market share in the sector to 29.9 percent as of November 2016 from around 19 percent a year earlier. Despite this, AMD currently has no direct competitor to the high-end GTX 1070 or GTX 1080 Pascal GPUs from Nvidia.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 12 > New AMD drivers hint at more Polaris GPUs to come
Allen Ngo, 2016-12-13 (Update: 2016-12-13)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.