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Minecraft: Reporters Without Borders build The Uncensored Library to leak censored articles globally

Minecraft: Reporters Without Borders build The Uncensored Library to leak censored articles globally
Minecraft: Reporters Without Borders build The Uncensored Library to leak censored articles globally
Many repressive states censor government-critical articles and block citizens' access to the material. The Reporters Without Borders organization is now breaking new ground to make censored articles accessible to everyone. They just paste the material into an Uncensored Library within Minecraft.

Minecraft is still one of the most popular games in the world and is considered the most viewed game on YouTube in 2019. So its range is enormous. And: Even in repressive countries like Russia, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Vietnam and Mexico, the game is accessible.

The non-governmental organization Reporters Without Borders has now taken advantage of this fact. In cooperation with BlockWorks, they built the huge Uncensored Library into the sandbox game. And in the library, various censored articles by blocked human rights activists and the like are freely accessible and can therefore also be viewed by citizens of the countries mentioned. The Minecraft library is available worldwide and a clever idea of the organization to bypass the various censorship blocks.

The building was erected in less than three months and 12.5 million blocks were used. 24 programmers from 16 different countries came together for the project, the building created in 250 working hours is one of the most impressive in the whole game. The map can be downloaded here.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 03 > Minecraft: Reporters Without Borders build The Uncensored Library to leak censored articles globally
Christian Hintze, 2020-03-16 (Update: 2020-03-16)
Christian Hintze
Editor of the original article: Christian Hintze - Editor
Because of my interest in computer games I started studying computer science, became a psychologist, but stayed true to the games and the hardware. For example during my year abroad in London as a games tester at Sega. In my spare time I find a balance between PC games and sports (meanwhile mainly indoor soccer and running after my toddler), playing guitar and building bamboo bikes (well, so far only one under guidance).