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Latest iPhone 7 rumors claim 3 GB RAM, no audio jack, no IP68 certification, and new color options

Latest iPhone 7 rumors claim 3 GB RAM, no audio jack, no IP68 certification, and new color options
Latest iPhone 7 rumors claim 3 GB RAM, no audio jack, no IP68 certification, and new color options
We've compiled a quick update on some of the newest rumors one month before Apple is expected to unveil the iPhone 6s successor(s).

Apple is expected to officially unveil the latest generation iPhone this coming September 6th or 7th with the very first batches to be available later that month. Whether the new model will be the iPhone 7 or even the iPhone 6 SE remains unclear, but our updated rumors and details are as follows.

New Color Options

Existing rumors claim that the next iPhone series could come in Deep Blue or Space Black colors, but early dummy models only showed known colors like Gold or Silver. However, a new dummy model has emerged with a Blue color scheme not unlike the Galaxy Note 7. The video below compares this supposed iPhone 7 with the existing iPhone 6s, but it otherwise shows no major hardware differences between them.

An alleged teaser image from Chinese mobile provider China Unicom shows all four possible colors for the upcoming iPhone series including Blue, Gold, Red, and Gray. The teaser also shows dual rear cameras on the back of the larger model that will likely be 5.5-inches in screen size. Of course, it remains to be seen if the image is authentic or a genuine leak.

Sources close to Foxconn claim that colors will be available in Black, Rose Gold, and Gold with a reference image shown below. It's clear that these rumors are contradictory, so users will likely have to wait until September for Apple to finally clear the air.

No IP68 Certification

Apple was rumored to be incorporating water and dust resistance on its next iPhone to better compete against the Galaxy S7 and Galaxy Note 7 series of smartphones. These Samsung alternatives, for example, are officially rated for normal operation up to a water depth of 1.5 m for 30 minutes. Unfortunately, newer rumors from alleged Foxconn sources claim that water and dust resistance on the next generation of iPhones will not be any better than on the current iPhone 6s series.

Lightning Earphones

In addition to the dual rear cameras of the larger 5.5-inch Plus model, Apple fans are also on the wire about potentially dropping the ubiquitous audio jack in favor of Lightning-only connectivity. Leaks relating to Lightning earphones and Lightning-to-audio jack adapters have recently surfaced to suggest that the company will likely abandon with the audio port altogether. The Moto Z, for example, has already taken this step.

More RAM?

Last but not least, a recent DigiTimes article is expecting production of RAM chips to increase in the coming quarter due largely to Apple's demands of 3 GB modules instead of 2 GB modules. The iPhone 6s series, for example, uses just 2 GB of RAM compared to 3 GB or even 4 GB from most competing flagship Android devices.

Nonetheless, it is not known if only the larger 5.5-inch iPhone would receive 3 GB of RAM or if both it and the 4.7-inch model would have 3 GB of RAM each.  It's possible that Apple will continue to equip the 4.7-inch unit with only 2 GB of RAM to create an incentive for users to upgrade to the larger model. On the other hand, having 3 GB of RAM on both sizes will mean more consistency regarding future software updates across its next generation of iPhone models.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 08 > Latest iPhone 7 rumors claim 3 GB RAM, no audio jack, no IP68 certification, and new color options
Alexander Fagot/ Allen Ngo, 2016-08- 8 (Update: 2017-09-26)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.