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Latest MacBook Air 2016 rumors point to an even thinner design

Latest MacBook Air 2016 rumors point to an even thinner design
Latest MacBook Air 2016 rumors point to an even thinner design
Apple may be planning a major overhaul of the MacBook Air. Next year's models could include an 11-inch SKU alongside a 15-inch SKU.

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Thinner, bigger, and stronger may be the motto for the next MacBook Air. The current MacBook Air is available in 11.6-inch and 13.3-inch form factors, but its design has been largely stagnant over the years and could certainly benefit from a major overhaul. According to a report from China claiming to be part of the iPhone team, the MacBook Air 2016 is scheduled to appear at the WWDC 2016 conference.

Visually, the next MacBook Air is expected to take design queues from the MacBook Pro and MacBook 12 with a height of only 13.1 mm and a starting price of 1000 Euros. Apple may also be considering extending the Air series to the 15.6-inch size category.

If the rumors hold true, then the MacBook Air 2016 may even borrow the unique battery design of the current MacBook 12. Other essential upgrades, such as Skylake and higher resolution display options, are essentially given. The MacBook Air continues to be one of the best thin-and-light notebooks available in the market.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 12 > Latest MacBook Air 2016 rumors point to an even thinner design
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-12- 3 (Update: 2015-12- 3)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.