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Huawei hosting virtual Easter Egg hunt for European users

Huawei hosting virtual Easter Egg hunt for European users
Huawei hosting virtual Easter Egg hunt for European users
The 360-degree virtual reality search can win players an Honor 5X smartphone and other prizes and discounts.

Honor's Easter Egg hunt won't require anyone to scavenge an actual garden, but the prizes may be more appealing than the usual golden egg. The virtual Honor Hunt lets players participate in an interactive 360-degree video where users can scroll around and find items of interest. Players who can correctly find all the hidden items will have a chance to win one of three Honor 5X bundles.

A bundle consists of the Honor 5X smartphone itself, a pair of headphones, and a selfie stick. Winners aren't the only ones who will walk away with prizes, however, as all participants who register between March 21st to the 30th will receive a redeemable email code with discounts for shopping at vMall.

According to Huawei, the email voucher will only be good until March 30th and can only be used on three deals exclusively at vMall. Users get 20 Euro discounts to new purchases of an Honor 5X or Honor 7 or a 39.9 Euro discount on an Honor 7 bundle with Virtual Reality accessories.

Participating in the virtual Easter Egg hunt is free, though only for users in parts of Europe. The Honor 5X proved to be a good phone for the price with some notable downsides including poor call quality, poor speaker quality, and short battery life.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 03 > Huawei hosting virtual Easter Egg hunt for European users
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-03-23 (Update: 2016-03-23)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.