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More Huawei P9 photos leak online

More Huawei P9 photos leak online
More Huawei P9 photos leak online
New images show the metal body and dual rear cameras from multiple angles.

Chinese tech site mydrivers.com doesn't have the best track record regarding leaks, but its latest images on the unannounced Huawei P9 at least appear to be plausible. The set of pictures show a white plastic band across the two rear cameras that matches the official teaser images from Huawei. The fingerprint scanner can also be seen while the images suggest that Huawei will not be turning to a unibody aluminum design for its upcoming flagship.

Rumored hardware specifications for the P9 include a 5.2-inch 1080p display, an octa-core Kirin 950 SoC, 32 GB eMMC, and dual rear 12 MP cameras with improved optical image stabilization (OIS).

Additional SKUs are also expected to be available with different screen sizes. The P9 Lite may be unveiled alongside the P9 and is rumored to be a 5-inch variant with an FHD panel and a mainstream Snapdragon 650 SoC. Finally, the P9 Max should offer an even larger 6.2-inch QHD (2560 x 1440) resolution display and come with the faster Kirin 955 SoC with 4 GB RAM, 64 to 128 GB eMMC, and the same dual rear cameras as the vanilla P9. Other rumors, however, suggest that the P9 Max could be a 5.8-inch smartphone instead. All should be revealed during the upcoming Huawei press event on April 6th.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 03 > More Huawei P9 photos leak online
Andreas Müller/ Allen Ngo, 2016-03-30 (Update: 2016-03-30)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.