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HTC 10 may include 3000 mAh battery; could skip AMOLED display

HTC 10: 3000-mAh-Akku und kein AMOLED-Display
HTC 10: 3000-mAh-Akku und kein AMOLED-Display
Upcoming flagship will reportedly carry a larger battery than the One M9 and without an AMOLED panel as found on the One A9.

According to @evleaks, the successor to the current One M9 flagship may come as early as April 19th or even earlier based on alleged leaks of the final design of the smartphone. The last leaked rendering is claiming a reveal date of April 12 with a scheduled press meeting in London. Now, the same #evleaks source has found more information over the weekend regarding the supposed HTC 10 smartphone.

Presumably, the next HTC smartphone will not utilize an AMOLED panel and will instead use Super LCD 5 (SLCD 5) compared to the current SLCD 3 on the One M9. If true, this suggests that the HTC 10 may not have an "always-on" display feature like on the Galaxy S7. The upcoming HTC flagship is also expected to have a larger 3000 mAh battery compared to the current 2840 mAh battery in the One M9. It's worth noting that the mid-range One A9 carries an AMOLED panel unlike its flagship One M9 sibling.

Beyond the new tidbits above, most of the smartphone remains a mystery as HTC has not officially unveiled any details on the device aside from its "exciting camera". Previous rumors point to a 5.15-inch 2560 x 1440 resolution display, Snapdragon 820 SoC with integrated Adreno 530 GPU, 4 GB RAM, and a 12 MP main camera.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 03 > HTC 10 may include 3000 mAh battery; could skip AMOLED display
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-03-21 (Update: 2016-03-21)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.