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New leaks suggest April 19th reveal date for HTC 10

New leaks suggest April 19th reveal date for HTC 10
New leaks suggest April 19th reveal date for HTC 10
Images and press renders reveal an updated design with USB Type-C and a wider Home button.

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The folks over at @evleaks are claiming an April 19th reveal date for the HTC One M9 successor. The latest rumors suggest that the Taiwanese manufacturer will drop the "One M10" name in favor of simply calling the next flagship the "HTC 10".

Leaked pictures from the same source point to a design somewhat similar to the current One M9 but with sharper beveled edges for an overall fresher look. The front is expected to carry a larger Home button with an integrated fingerprint reader and pressure sensor while the bottom edge of the smartphone will have the more modern USB Type-C connector in place of the aging micro-USB port.

Previous leaks are claiming that the HTC 10 will have the following core specifications:

  • 5.15-inch 2560 x 1440 resolution display
  • Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 SoC
  • Adreno 530 GPU
  • 4 GB RAM
  • 12 MP main camera

The manufacturer recently released a short teaser video in an attempt to create hype surrounding the eventual reveal. WHile HTC's latest financial results were less than stellar, its executives have expressed enthusiasm for the One M9 successor and its supposedly unique camera features that it will bring to the market.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 03 > New leaks suggest April 19th reveal date for HTC 10
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-03- 7 (Update: 2016-03- 7)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.