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Gionee announces $50 million USD partnership with Foxconn and Dixon

Gionee: Partnerschaft mit Foxconn und Dixon für Smartphone-Produktion in Indien
Gionee: Partnerschaft mit Foxconn und Dixon für Smartphone-Produktion in Indien
Chinese company Gionee is investing $50 million USD to manufacture smartphones in India as part of its "Make in India" initiative.

Lenovo and Motorola have already established a partnership in India to manufacture more mobile devices under shared factories. Now, according to media records, Chinese supplier Gionee will be investing roughly 44 million Euros (3.3 billion INR) into smartphone manufacturing in India over the next three years.

The Chinese telecommunications company will be partnering with Foxconn and Dixon Technologies for the joint venture. The companies will maintain production and upkeep of facilities in and around Andhra Pradesh and Delhi. More specifically, Foxconn will take over production of the existing F series and P series of devices, while Dixon will handle production of cheaper budget-grade models.

Gionee is expecting to start with a production capacity of up to 1.2 million smartphones beginning October 2015 according to CEO of Gionee India Arvind R. Vohra. Vohra is also the director of Gionee subsidiary Syntech Technology Pvt Ltd. headquartered in Delhi. If successful, the initiative will greatly boost Gionee as a brand name in the region. Gionee President William Lu added that India is the second most important market today behind China.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 09 > Gionee announces $50 million USD partnership with Foxconn and Dixon
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-09-13 (Update: 2015-09-14)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.