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Buy a Gigabyte laptop and get a tree

Buy a Gigabyte laptop and get a tree
Buy a Gigabyte laptop and get a tree
The manufacturer will plant one tree for every laptop registered since the beginning of 2017 as part of its new Make Earth Green Again campaign.

In honor of Earth Day, Gigabyte/Aorus is launching a new campaign called Make Earth Green Again as an extension of the existing Plant-for-the-Planet campaign that aims to plant as many as 1 trillion tree seeds by 2020. The Taiwanese manufacturer has also joined forces with the United Nations Eivornment Programme (UNEP) in hopes of raising awareness of global warming and the rapidly decreasing forests around the world.

When a user purchases a new Gigabyte laptop and registers the product online, the registrant can voluntarily opt in to Plant-for-the-Planet and receive a certificate for his or her contributions.

Gigabyte as a company has always been eco-conscious. According to its press release, the manufacturer has reduced its carbon emissions by 40 percent compared to 2007 levels and its own headquarters building in Taiwan includes a sustainable eco-friendly rooftop. Other manufacturers have also been running eco-friendly programs to reduce waste and emissions including Lenovo and its use of recycled packaging materials or Dell and its campaign to pick up plastic wastes from oceans.

If you have recently purchased or will soon own a Gigabyte laptop, then check out the source below to register the device and learn about the program.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 04 > Buy a Gigabyte laptop and get a tree
Allen Ngo, 2017-04-25 (Update: 2017-04-25)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.