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BLU releases software fix for bricked Life One X2 phones, but it may not work for everyone

Image: BLU Twitter (highlighting added by news editor)
Image: BLU Twitter (highlighting added by news editor)
BLU has released a fix for the phone-bricking OTA update they issued last week. While many users are reporting success, some customers will be left out to dry. Affected users are understandably upset at the latest misstep by BLU.

BLU is having a pretty rough week. After issuing a software update that essentially bricked one of their devices, the Life One X2, the Florida-based budget smartphone retailer has been virtually silent on the issue. Yesterday, BLU announced a software fix for users that have been locked out of their phones for a week. Unfortunately, it may not be a viable solution for a large portion of affected users.

The software update released last week came with a bug that prevented users from finishing the update installation, rendering the phone completely useless. Many users were left with bricked devices, and some resorted to a factory reset in order to fix the problem, losing all their data in the process. After about a week of radio silence, BLU went to Twitter and Facebook yesterday to announce they had developed a fix for the issue, but there are quite a few caveats.

First, affected users will have to email a dedicated account ([email protected]) to receive the software solution. Once the software is downloaded via the email from BLU, users will have to load it onto a microSD card, insert the card into their phone, and execute the code. This is a fairly involved process to get a fix to a phone-breaking problem, and it may require some financial outlay for customers that don’t own a microSD card. It’s also interesting that BLU is resorting to an email chain to deliver the fix instead of a publically accessible link, which would be much more convenient for affected customers.

The cherry on top is that this solution may not be viable for all affected users. Obviously, those that performed a factory reset are out of luck; user data that is wiped when a phone is factory reset is permanently lost unless it was backed up externally. Also, users that attempted to enter their PIN multiple times during the update process won’t be able to use this fix. The phone would lock itself after too many failed PIN entry attempts, and with no access to the phone’s firmware (as it’s essentially stuck in an update process), the device is nothing more than a paperweight.

BLU customers are understandably upset. Many users flocked to BLU’s Twitter and Facebook pages, criticizing the company for its lengthy response time, for not releasing the fix through a public link, and for the requirement to purchase a microSD card, among other complaints. Some customers also pointed out that Amazon may buy back BLU devices that were affected by the update bug, and one user has claimed that there will be a class action suit against BLU, although we could not confirm either of these details at press time.

BLU's Facebook page is rife with critical comments.
BLU's Facebook page is rife with critical comments.
Twitter extended even less grace.
Twitter extended even less grace.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 12 > BLU releases software fix for bricked Life One X2 phones, but it may not work for everyone
Sam Medley, 2017-12- 5 (Update: 2017-12- 5)
Sam Medley
Sam Medley - Review Editor - @samuel_medley
I've been a "tech-head" my entire life. After graduating college with a degree in Mathematics, I worked in finance and banking a few years before taking a job as a Systems Analyst for my local school district. I started working with Notebookcheck in October of 2016 and have enjoyed writing news articles and notebook reviews. My areas of interest include the business side of technology, retro gaming, Linux, and innovative gadgets. When I'm not hunched over an electronic device or writing code for a new database, I'm either outside with my family, playing a decade-old video game, or sitting behind a drum set.