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Android and iOS duopoly at record levels as of Q2 2016

Android and iOS duopoly growing larger
Android and iOS duopoly growing larger
The steady fall of Windows Mobile 10 and BlackBerry OS have paved the way for Google and Apple to take nearly 100 percent of the worldwide smartphone market.

Android and iOS now control over 99 percent of the smartphone market according to the latest data from Gartner. Together, they make up over 344.4 million smartphones sold globally as of 2Q 2016. Windows Mobile 10 has fallen from 2.5 percent to 0.6 percent YoY as Microsoft has essentially abandoned the platform. BlackBerry OS has also dropped to insignificant levels at just 0.1 percent.

Despite Android's lead at 86.2 percent of the market, Apple is still holding strong at 12.9 percent down from 14.6 percent a year earlier. Buyers are likely waiting on new announcements from the Cupertino company as rumors continue to build on the iPhone 6s successor. Nonetheless, this is still quite impressive considering that Apple is just one manufacturer from a sea of others.

Overall, consumers have bought 4.3 million more smartphones this quarter compared to Q2 2015. Samsung holds the widest lead as reported earlier with over 22 percent of the smartphone market as of Q2 2016. Google is expected to unveil its latest Nexus refresh with Android Nougat in the coming weeks to months.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 08 > Android and iOS duopoly at record levels as of Q2 2016
Florian Wimmer/ Allen Ngo, 2016-08-22 (Update: 2016-08-22)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.