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Acer teases Holo 360 smartphone with integrated 360-degree cameras

Acer teases Holo 360 smartphone with integrated 360-degree cameras
Acer teases Holo 360 smartphone with integrated 360-degree cameras
The work-in-progress Android smartphone was just a small asterisk in the [email protected] press event, but it serves as a tiny glimpse into what Acer may have in store in the next few years.

Amidst the slew of new laptop announcements from Acer at the New York event last week, the Taiwanese manufacturer also touched on a prototype Android smartphone called the Holo 360. Since it is in its early stages of development, not much information was divulged including its resolution, processor, or even when or if we would ever see such a device in the retail market. The Holo 360 is notable for its integration of 360-degree cameras onto a standard Android smartphone with WiFi and LTE connectivity. 360-degree camera attachments like the Samsung 360 would be unnecessary.

The prototype that was on show, however, looked quite thick and boxy with a very low screen-to-body ratio. It's definitely interesting to see Acer spend valuable R&D time on a device like the Holo 360 when competing manufacturers are trending towards bezel-free designs and flexible OLED displays. While panoramas will indubitably be quite impressive, its market appeal may run the risk of being too niche especially if the current design doesn't significantly improve.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 05 > Acer teases Holo 360 smartphone with integrated 360-degree cameras
Allen Ngo, 2017-05- 4 (Update: 2017-05- 4)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.