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AMD Radeon R9 Nano coming this September for $649

AMD Radeon R9 Nano coming this September for $649
AMD Radeon R9 Nano coming this September for $649
The R9 Nano will be 30 percent faster than the R9 290X and include HBM.

The Mini PC and HTPC markets have always felt like peripherals to the larger desktop and laptop markets. AMD is finally giving ultra-small form factors the spotlight with the announcement of the Radeon R9 Nano.

The 28 nm R9 Nano is a 175 W card built with mini ITX machines in mind. It is merely 6 inches in length and is already estimated to be 30 percent faster than the Radeon R9 290X with high-bandwidth memory, FreeSync, 4K support, Eyefinity, and even CrossFire with up to four cards. More details and specs can be found on the official AMD page.

Multiple R9 Nano configurations will be available starting from as low as $200 up to $650. AMD has yet to detail the exact models at launch, but first public availability will be this September 7. Resellers like CybertronPC are already jumping on board to offer pre-built machines with the R9 Nano included. The Nano series has the potential to capture a good chunk of the Mini PC market for AMD, who has been struggling in the desktop and notebook markets against Intel and Nvidia.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 08 > AMD Radeon R9 Nano coming this September for $649
Allen Ngo, 2015-08-27 (Update: 2015-08-27)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.