Notebookcheck

AMD reports more losses while Google sees higher profits

AMD reports more losses while Google sees higher profits
AMD reports more losses while Google sees higher profits
The descent of AMD continues as the chipmaker reports less than $1 billion USD in sales for Q2 2015. Meanwhile, Google reports more sales and higher earnings during the same period.

Though Intel may be experiencing a smaller hit to its bottom line, the decline of PC sales last quarter had a larger impact on AMD. The chipmaker continues to dig deeper in the red and, as of Q2 2015, it had posted its lowest sales ever in the past 12 years.

AMD sales have fallen by 35 percent year-to-year from $1.446 billion USD to just $942 million. Net losses have also been disastrous during the same period from $36 million to $181 million. The poor financial results can be attributed to slow sales of its processors and Radeon GPUs. This will make it much more difficult for AMD to implement potential long-term strategies for growth.

Meanwhile, Google has reason to celebrate as Q2 2015 saw $17.727 billion in revenue compared to $15.955 billion the year before for an increase of 11.1 percent. About $12.4 billion of that revenue came from Google's own websites, while $3.621 billion came from partner sites. Net profit has also climbed 17.3 percent from $3.351 billion to $3.931 billion. Overall, advertising revenue amounted to 16.023 billion for the search giant.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2015 07 > AMD reports more losses while Google sees higher profits
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2015-07-19 (Update: 2015-07-19)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.