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Deal | ACIL H2 earbuds with Bluetooth and noise cancellation now shipping for $50

ACIL H2 earbuds with Bluetooth and noise cancellation now shipping for $50 (Image source: Amazon)
ACIL H2 earbuds with Bluetooth and noise cancellation now shipping for $50 (Image source: Amazon)
The earbuds promise 12 hours of music playback with a charge time of only 1.5 hours. Unlike most wireless earbuds, the H2 earbuds have a cable and are designed to stay in the ears whilst jogging or exercising.
Allen Ngo,

Headphones and earphones are projected to grow into a 45 billion dollar industry in just a few years. If you've got a smartphone with no headphone jack, there are now numerous wireless options with fewer reasons to not own a pair.

One such pair to consider are the ACIL H2 designed for exercise or athletes. Unlike the earbuds we've already covered, these in-ear earbuds are connected to one another with a cable to make them more difficult to lose or misplace. Should an earpiece pop out, you can be sure they won't roll away on the ground during your routine jogging session.

The cable also allows users to directly control the volume of the earbuds without needing to whip out the smartphone. Charging the earbuds is accomplished via a micro-USB port on the cable as well. The box includes three pairs of silicone ear tips and a short micro-USB cable.

We would have preferred Bluetooth 5 connectivity instead of Bluetooth 4.1 and USB Type-C instead of micro-USB especially since these earbuds are relatively new.

The ACIL H2 can be found on Amazon for $50 USD.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 04 > ACIL H2 earbuds with Bluetooth and noise cancellation now shipping for $50
Allen Ngo, 2020-04-10 (Update: 2020-04-13)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.