Review Sony Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B (FHD) Notebook

Sebastian Jentsch (translated by Liala Stieglitz), 08/07/2011

Master of contrast. Premium range or low-cost Full HD? The 16.4 incher from the F series can already be yours for 875 euros. However, we can only confirm that the higher priced test device has superb colors. Is the F22 suitable as a workplace and HD studio?

Sony Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B: Are leaving out black high-gloss and the 3D screen the only novelties in contrast to the predecessor, F21Z1/BI?
Sony Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B: Are leaving out black high-gloss and the 3D screen the only novelties in contrast to the predecessor, F21Z1/BI?

Sony's F series is treated as the HD Studio range since the beginning of 2010 (F21) depending on the configuration. Strong CPU, performance, feasible graphics performance and a first-rate screen (display model according to Sony: VAIO Display Premium) are to ensure lively entertainment on the one hand and efficient working on the other.

The high-end 3D model, Vaio VPC-F21Z1E/BI with a 240 Hz 3D screen and shutter glasses, was the first test device from the 2011 F range. 3D effects and screen quality impressed us, but the case's high-gloss finish quickly covered with fingerprints wasn't appealing. Especially not at today's price of 1700 euros (August 2011) and 1999 euros back then (May 2011).

Now the manufacturer remedies this with the F22 because these models not only have (as usual) a matt screen, but also a matt, uncoated case. An important question: Does the lower priced F22 have the same high-end screen? Sony leaves us in the dark since the “VAIO Display Premium” labels both the F22S1E/B (this review) and the F21Z1E/BI (3D device).

The answer for this and other questions can be found in this review. Due to the extreme technical similarities (only screen and looks differ) of both test devices, F21 and F22 (present), we would refer to the review of the F21 in matters of input devices, interfaces, communication and audio. All other topics, such as display, performance and ergonomics, will be described anew.

Case

The F22 shows up as a bulky block of 3.17 kilograms. The looks mimic two overlapping, inward tapered plates. The base unit is as stiff as a board and we can only provoke evident denting beneath the optical drive. In return, we can depress the lid's surface easily. Moreover, the construction clearly distorts when it's picked up at its corners.

The 16.4 incher's rigidity and workmanship is absolutely equal to that of the F21. The lack of paint on the lid and work surface is new. The F21's greasy fingers look is gone and with it the drawbacks such as fingerprints and soon visible scratches. This creates a laptop with looks so sober and resistant that we are confident that it can cope with longer periods of office work.

With a matt plastic lid,
With a matt plastic lid,
fingerprint-free wrist-rest
fingerprint-free wrist-rest
and stable hinges
and stable hinges

Connectivity

All interfaces and their positioning remain the same as in the predecessor, F21. Thus, demanding users will be forced to switch to USB 3.0 peripherals. Conventional connections, such as eSATA and ExpressCard34 are, as usual, not installed. We refer to the review of the Vaio VPC-F21Z1E/BI for more details.

Front: FireWire, wireless slider, Memory Stick & SD card reader combination
Front: FireWire, wireless slider, Memory Stick & SD card reader combination
Left: AC, VGA, HDMI, LAN, 2 USB 3.0s
Left: AC, VGA, HDMI, LAN, 2 USB 3.0s
Rear: No interfaces
Rear: No interfaces
Right: 2 audios, USB 2.0, BluRay RW
Right: 2 audios, USB 2.0, BluRay RW

Input Devices

Keyboard and Touchpad

The manufacturer doesn't risk anything and keeps the good input devices of the predecessor, Vaio VPC-F21Z1E/BI. The light rubber coating on the keys (mouse keys too) again looks slip-proof and the key light (adaptive, can be turned off) ensures the best visibility in dark living rooms.

The pad, placed in the elevated wrist-rest, is covered with tiny knobs, which relieves the fingers from slipping and prevents unsightly signs of wear on the surface. Although both input devices are absolutely identical with the predecessor's, an office suitable look is created due to the lack of a high-gloss work surface.

 

Clearly arranged number pad keyboard
Clearly arranged number pad keyboard
with a crisp pressure point and firm stroke,
with a crisp pressure point and firm stroke,
The matt surfaces provide everyday suitability,
The matt surfaces provide everyday suitability,
Knobby touchpad surface.
Knobby touchpad surface.

Display

Many fans of premium laptop screens will have followed the review of the predecessor, Vaio VPC-F21Z1E/BI, with interest. The anti-glare FHD display's color spectrum and contrasts had a high, professional-suitable standard. The case's high-gloss looks and the 3D feature (with shutter) in line with a very high price (currently 1720 euros) was likely not according to everyone's taste, though.

Can the cheaper successor model, with a matt look and a current price of 1400 euros supply the same, high-end screen? It can, even if there are positive and negative differences in detail. We consider the higher contrast of 1007:1 (rather than 396:1 - F21) as beneficial. Colors are bright and crisp, and the edges are deep black when watching movies.

The F22 is still equipped with 1920x1080 pixels (Full HD). Thus, the 16 incher is suitable for HD movie fans (BluRay burner) as well as display screen workers looking for a lot of overview.

The color spectrum measurement shows a tight sRGB (t) color space. It isn't completely covered, as shown in the comparison of the F21 and F22 (picture 3). The good FHD screen, for consumer relations, in the cheaper Vaio EB4X can't reproduce quite as many colors. However, the Asus G74 gaming notebook, which covers the sRGB a bit better, can.

Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B vs. sRGB (t)
Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B vs. sRGB (t)
Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B vs. AdobeRGB (t)
Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B vs. AdobeRGB (t)
Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B vs. Vaio F21Z1E/BI (t)
Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B vs. Vaio F21Z1E/BI (t)
Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B vs. Asus G74 FHD (t)
Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B vs. Asus G74 FHD (t)
Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B vs. Dell Latitude E6520 FHD (t)
Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B vs. Dell Latitude E6520 FHD (t)
Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B vs. Vaio EB4X FHD (t)
Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B vs. Vaio EB4X FHD (t)
243
cd/m²
248
cd/m²
299
cd/m²
272
cd/m²
272
cd/m²
298
cd/m²
308
cd/m²
324
cd/m²
309
cd/m²
Distribution of brightness
Information
Gossen Mavo-Monitor
Maximum: 324 cd/m²
Average: 285.9 cd/m²
Brightness Distribution: 75 %
Center on Battery: 272 cd/m²
Black: 0.27 cd/m²
Contrast: 1007:1

The backlight illuminates the display to an average of 286 cd/m2. This is equal to the predecessor, F21, and is still a very high rate. We even measure 324 cd/m2 selectively. The sectors' varying brightness can't be seen with the naked eye (homogeneity 75%; F21: 86%). The screen has deteriorated in this point.

No difference. The high brightness and anti-glare screen are an option for the summer. 3.17 kilograms aren't ideal for the beer garden, but it's perfectly suitable for the reflection-free computer workplace.

F22: Lateral view, sunny
F22: Lateral view, sunny
F22: Lateral view, sunny
F22: Lateral view, sunny
F22: Frontal view, sunny
F22: Frontal view, sunny
F21: Lateral view, sunny
F21: Lateral view, sunny
F21: Lateral view, sunny
F21: Lateral view, sunny
F21: Frontal view, sunny
F21: Frontal view, sunny

The F21 3D screen's viewing angles (predecessor) made us look enthusiastically onto the display. They were at about 85 degrees horizontally and vertically. That corresponded to the TFT screen model IPS (in plane switching). The usual TN displays (twisted nematic) don't go beyond 45 degrees horizontally and 15 degrees vertically.

The Vaio F22 facing us can unfortunately only keep up with the F21 screen's strong impression in horizontal deviations (85 degrees). The usual contrast changes and color inversions start at 15 to 20 degrees vertically. Please see our video.

Viewing angles: Sony Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B
Viewing angles: Sony Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B

Performance

The Core i7-2630QM with 4x2.0 GHz (Turbo: 2.9 GHz) isn't the only CPU options available for the F22 models, but it is the strongest. The Core i5-2410M (2x2.30 GHz) is the lowest priced option (starts at 865 euros, also FHD). The quad core 2630QM is currently a often used processor in strong multimedia and gaming laptops. Turbo Boost 2.0 adds a plus on performance with the "Dynamic Range @Turbo Frequency Limits". Providing that the cooling is sufficient (temperature limits), the Turbo can go beyond 2.9 GHz.

The graphics chip, HD Graphics 3000, in the processor is disabled (no Nvidia Optimus). The Geforce GT 540M can therefore not be disabled. Our F22 is equipped with an 8192 MB RAM (2x4096 MB PC3-10600) and a 640 GB hard disk from Toshiba (7200 rpm).

System info CPUZ CPU
System info CPUZ Cache
System info CPUZ Mainboard
System info CPUZ Mem
System info CPUZ SPD
System info CPUZ GT 540M
DPC Latency Checker idle, no latencies
DPC Latency Checker WLAN on/off, rare latencies
System information: Sony Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B

The CPU benchmark, WPrime (314s), determined rates clearly below those of the 2010 720QM (483s) and 740QM (427s). The fewer seconds, the better is true for this multi CPU test. Thus, the 2630QM is 25 percent faster than its 740QM predecessor. The 2630QM has never reached such a good WPrime score in newer laptops. But, the Acer Aspire 7750G (318s) and the Dell Inspiron Queen Q15R (321s) follow very close. A "bad" 435s, as in the Samsung RF511-S05DE, are rare.

The Cinebench 11.5 CPU test (multi, 64bit) strikes strongly with 4.92 points. That is considerably more than a 740QM (3.4; MSI GX660R) reached. However, the "identical" i7-2630QM in the Aspire 7750G could score even better with 5.0 points, which could be due to a better utilization of the Dynamic Frequency (Turbo 2.0).

Cinebench R10 Rendering Single 32Bit
3615
Cinebench R10 Rendering Multiple CPUs 32Bit
13825
Cinebench R10 Shading 32Bit
5009
Cinebench R10 Rendering Single CPUs 64Bit
4531 Points
Cinebench R10 Rendering Multiple CPUs 64Bit
16724 Points
Cinebench R10 Shading 64Bit
5275 Points
Cinebench R11.5 OpenGL 64Bit
24.81 fps
Cinebench R11.5 CPU Multi 64Bit
4.92 Points
Help

PCMark Vantage records 7488 points (F21: 7312). A remarkable figure that is even on a par with an (older) workstation with i7-820QM (1.7 GHz, 3.0) from 2010 (HP Elitebook 8740w 820QM/FX2800M, 7491 points). 7500 points is a typical rate for this configuration. In comparison, an Aspire 7750G with the same processor manages 7402 points (HP 6850M). Only Packard Bell's EasyNote TS11-HR-158GE and Samsung RF511 lag behind with 6530 points, which is possibly due to a slower rotating HDD and possibly due to a weaker cooling system (lower Turbo 2.0 utilization). The CPU benchmarks are also lower in both notebooks (Cinebench R11.5: 4.7/4.4 instead of 4.92).

The MSI GT780R can achieve 9314 points in PCMark Vantage with a stronger GPU (GTX 560M). Laptops equipped with an SSD, such as the Alienware M17x R3 (GTX 460M, i7-2630QM) or the XMG A701 (identical), reach considerably betters scores (12700 / 14000).

We additionally executed PCMark 7, which finishes with 2211 points. Current Core i5 systems, such as the Toshiba Satellite Pro L770 achieve about 5500, respectively 1850 points, if they don't have an SSD. Previous 2630QM test systems could reach higher PCMark 7 scores only when an SSD and /or stronger GPU were installed. This was, for example, the case in the Alienware M14x (GT 555M, SSD, 3595 points) and in the MSI GT780R (GTX 560M, 5400 rpm HDD, 2516 points).

5.9
Windows 7 Experience Index
Processor
Calculations per second
7.4
Memory (RAM)
Memory operations per second
7.6
Graphics
Desktop performance for Windows Aero
6.7
Gaming graphics
3D business and gaming graphics
6.7
Primary hard disk
Disk data transfer rate
5.9
PC Mark
PCMark Vantage7488 points
PCMark 72211 points
Help

The GeForce GT 540M's 3D performance (1024 MB DDR3) from Nvidia's midrange didn't improve/deteriorate a bit despite the driver update (F21 in review: ForceWare 266.64 -> F22: 267.80). Why should it? The clock of 672/900 MHz (core/memory) alike the DDR3 video memory hasn't changed, either.

3DMark2006 (1280x1024) finishes with 8263 points (F21:8318). A Radeon HD 6850M (~9700) can even top that with the same memory unit. Just like the current HD 6770M (10786) in the HP Pavilion dv6-6008eg.

The 3DMark Vantage score (P4440, F21: 4589) improves slightly by 150 points. The new 3DMark 11 (P1027, F21: P1033) doesn't make a difference despite the driver update.

3D Mark
3DMark 06
 1280x1024
8263 points
3DMark Vantage4440 points
3DMark 111027 points
Help

HD Tune (84 MB/s read) and Crystal Disk Mark 3.0 (92 MB/s read) attest this Toshiba HDD (640 GB) very good throughputs. CrystalDiskMark 3.0 is a lot higher than HDTune, which can be explained by a different routine. PCMark Vantage's HDD score records good 4379 points (F21: 4293), which is adequate for a 7200 rpm HDD.

Toshiba MK6461GSY, 640GB 7200 rpm
Toshiba MK6461GSY, 640GB 7200 rpm
HD-Tune 84 MB/s read
HD-Tune 84 MB/s read
CDM 92/95 MB/s read/write
CDM 92/95 MB/s read/write
Toshiba MK6461GSY
Transfer Rate Minimum: 28.9 MB/s
Transfer Rate Maximum: 114.6 MB/s
Transfer Rate Average: 82.8 MB/s
Access Time: 16.5 ms
Burst Rate: 76.2 MB/s
CPU Usage: 1 %

Gaming Verdict

A random test with Battlefield: Bad Company 2 confirms the first F21 test device's good, but not overwhelming gaming performance. Smooth game play is possible as long as the gamer doesn't switch to the native 1920x1080 pixels. The GT 540M is too weak for high details beyond WXGA especially with a DDR3 video memory. A better choice for eager gamers would be an HD 6770M (HP Pavilion dv6-6008eg, high: 48 fps) or a GTX 560M (MSI GT780R, high: 68 fps) at the moment.

BFBC2: Medium smooth 44fps
BFBC2: Medium smooth 44fps
BFBC2: High smooth 31fps
BFBC2: High smooth 31fps
BFBC2: Ultra FHD very jerky 16fps
BFBC2: Ultra FHD very jerky 16fps
Battlefield: Bad Company 2
 ResolutionSettingsValue
 1920x1080high, HBAO on, 4xAA, 8xAF15.8 fps
 1366x768high, HBAO on, 1xAA, 4xAF31.3 fps
 1366x768medium, HBAO off, 1xAA, 1xAF44.3 fps
low med.high ultra
Battlefield: Bad Company 2 (2010) 44.331.315.8fps

Emissions

Left vent
Left vent

System Noise

Sony solves the quad core laptop's waste heat problem quite successfully. The noise level increases to 44 dB (A) during normal load, such as a computer game or 3DMark06. But the level drops to 34 dB (A) after a while. These fluctuations aren't very annoying because they happen slowly. If you surf on the Internet or write in Word, you'll always hear the fan because it's never off - not even after very long idle periods in energy saving mode.

The stress test, where the processor and the graphics card are put under full load, tickles out the maximum 49 dB (A) of the 16 incher. The noise isn't constant here, either. The fan repeatedly reduces its speed to 34 dB (A) after a few minutes (for about 20 seconds). This fan behavior can get annoying in the long run. A constant noise of 42 dB (A) would be more endurable. Sony could remedy this by changing the fan tables in the BIOS. We have to note that this level only turned up in a state of unrealistic maximum load.

Noise Level

Idle 31.9 / 33 / 34.7 dB(A)
HDD 31 dB(A)
DVD 35.3 / dB(A)
Load 44.3 / 49.4 dB(A)
 
    30 dB
silent
40 dB
audible
50 dB
loud
 
min: , med: , max:    Voltcraft sl-320 (15 cm distance)

Temperature

The temperatures really get down to business during load. This doesn't apply as much to games, but rather more for the stress test (processor and graphics card). We measure 51 degrees Celsius on the bottom in the fan's area. It is 42 degrees on the top in the keyboard's center. The stress test is however not a reference for normal use. If you watch YouTube videos or write emails, you'll only experience lukewarm temperatures of 25 to 30 degrees (see idle: ~25 degrees).

Thermal Throttling?

There was no throttling recorded during the stress test (Prime95+Furmark, see screen) over several hours (clock 4/8x2.2 GHz). The Turbo even remained active at 4/8 cores (Hyper Threading) during full load because it was slightly above the default clock of 2.0 GHz. An indication for a throttling-free laptop was also the constant stress power consumption of 126 watts (Prime95 solo: 103w, Furmark solo: 83w).

Prime95+Furmark: 4x2.2GHz no throttling, Turbo active
Prime95+Furmark: 4x2.2GHz no throttling, Turbo active
Prime95 solo: 4x2.2GHz no throttling, Turbo active
Prime95 solo: 4x2.2GHz no throttling, Turbo active
Furmark solo: no CPU throttling, GPU 670MHz, Turbo active
Furmark solo: no CPU throttling, GPU 670MHz, Turbo active
Max. Load
 41.2 °C36.1 °C32 °C 
 39.7 °C41.3 °C31.8 °C 
 39.8 °C42.1 °C36 °C 
Maximum: 42.1 °C
Average: 37.8 °C
27 °C28.1 °C50.8 °C
28.3 °C36.6 °C41.4 °C
31 °C33.6 °C41.3 °C
Maximum: 50.8 °C
Average: 35.3 °C
Power Supply (max.)  53 °C | Room Temperature 23.6 °C | Voltcraft IR-360

Battery Life

Somehow, Sony has managed to make the Vaio F22 a bit more economic despite the almost same hardware. The F22 needs a minimum (idle min-max) 16 to 28 watts (F21: 22 to 35 watts. However, the 16-incher is still above the level of similar sized laptops, such as the Alienware M17X R3 with 17/26 watts or Acer Aspire 7750G with 13/19 watts. Both have the same processor and even a bigger size with 17 inches.

The power consumption increases constantly to 126 watts during maximum load. Now it becomes apparent why the user won't get around the bulky and 660 gram heavy 150 watt power adapter. Only 84 watts are consumed during 3DMark 2006, which also applies to games. The power adapter doesn't get as hot as in the stress test anymore (53 watts).

Power Consumption

Off / Standby 0.3 / 0.6 Watt
Idle 15.8 / 26.8 / 28.4 Watt
Load 83.7 / 126 Watt
 
Key: min: , med: , max:         Voltcraft VC 960

The battery runtimes are, alike the F21 predecessor, rather tight, but they have increased despite the maintained battery capacity (54 Wh, lithium ion, 5400 mAh). The battery is drained after only 3:15 hours (F21: 2:28) when surfing on the Internet via WLAN. The DVD movie, Lord of the Rings, came to its end after 2:11 hours (F21: 1:58). A very similar runtime is achieved with a BluRay: 1:56 hours. The screen ran with 100 cd/m2 in this test.

Charging: 252 min
Charging: 252 min
DVD: 131 min
DVD: 131 min
BluRay: 133 min
BluRay: 133 min
WLAN: 195 min
WLAN: 195 min
Idle: 268 min
Idle: 268 min
Battery Runtime
Idle (without WLAN, min brightness)
4h 28min
WiFi Surfing
3h 15min
DVD
2h 11min
Blu-ray
2h 13min
Load (maximum brightness)
1h 47min

Verdict

Sony doesn't use the greasy finger look, but fortunately maintains a high-end Full HD screen. The Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B is still neither a bargain nor the perfectly equipped Studio laptop at a price of 1400 euros. The connectivity is too Spartan for this notebook category (USB 3.0, but no eSATA, ExpressCard) and the plastic look doesn't support the manufacturer's demanded high price.

In return, the display as well as the system performance is undoubtedly impressive. The premium Full HD screen bids wide (horizontal) viewing angles and contrast rich colors (1007:1) and almost an sRGB color space. The CPU performance isn't in danger of throttling and the 640 GB hard disk is comparatively fast. Newer games aren't the midrange GeForce GT 540M's specialty, though. Games are remote from smooth in Full HD and high details.

The high performance partly takes its toll on the ergonomic figures. The F22 gets very loud during maximum load (fluctuates) and the temperatures selectively come close to 50 degrees.

Sony Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B: First rate VAIO Display Premium with a very good contrast
Sony Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B: First rate VAIO Display Premium with a very good contrast
By courtesy of ...
In Review: Sony Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B, by courtesy of:
In Review:  Sony Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B

Specifications

Sony Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B

:: Processor
:: Mainboard
Intel HM65
:: Memory
8192 MB, 2x4096MB PC3-10600
:: Graphics adapter
NVIDIA GeForce GT 540M - 1024 MB, Core: 672 MHz, Memory: 900 MHz, DDR3, ForceWare 267.80
:: Display
16.4 inch 16:9, 1920x1080 pixel, VAIO Premium-Display CMO1601-N164HGE-L12, light AR coating, glossy: no
:: Harddisk
Toshiba MK6461GSY, 640 GB 7200 rpm
:: Soundcard
Realtek ALC275
:: Connections
1 USB 2.0, 2 USB 3.0, 1 Firewire, 1 VGA, 1 HDMI, 1 Kensington Lock, Audio Connections: headphone, microphone, Card Reader: Memory Stick Duo (MS PRO-HG, MagicGate) & SD (SDHC, SDXC), automatic brightness control
:: Networking
Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller (10/100/1000MBit), Atheros AR9285 Wireless Network Adapter (b g n ), 3.0 + HS Bluetooth
:: Optical drive
Pioneer BD-RW BDR-TD03
:: Size
height x width x depth (in mm): 45.4 x 398.3 x 271.3
:: Weight
3.17 kg Power Supply: 0.665 kg
:: Battery
54 Wh Lithium-Ion, VGP-BPS21A 10.8V 5000mAh
:: Price
1400 Euro
:: Operating System
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64 Bit
:: Additional features
Webcam: 1.3MP 1280×1024, PMB VAIO Edition, Adobe Photoshop Elements 9, Adobe Premiere Elements 9, PlayStation 3, 24 Months Warranty

 

Sony's Vaio F series isn't only available as "polished cases"-
Sony's Vaio F series isn't only available as "polished cases"-
Why do we need such large rubber pads on the lid?
Why do we need such large rubber pads on the lid?
The elevated wrist-rest forces this measure.
The elevated wrist-rest forces this measure.
We ask ourselves: Is the screen of the same high quality as the one in our F21 test device (3D Ready)?
We ask ourselves: Is the screen of the same high quality as the one in our F21 test device (3D Ready)?
The contrasts are even a lot better (1007:1),
The contrasts are even a lot better (1007:1),
the viewing angles can only keep up horizontally (85 degrees), though.
the viewing angles can only keep up horizontally (85 degrees), though.
The bulky 150 watt power adapter weighs 665 grams.
The bulky 150 watt power adapter weighs 665 grams.
The 16 incher draws 126 watts out of the mains during maximum load.
The 16 incher draws 126 watts out of the mains during maximum load.
The battery runtimes have improved slightly in contrast to the F21.
The battery runtimes have improved slightly in contrast to the F21.
The battery model and capacity are the same.
The battery model and capacity are the same.
There are no recovery data carriers included.
There are no recovery data carriers included.
The details on the case have been implemented discreetly (power on).
The details on the case have been implemented discreetly (power on).
The "Web" button is now found where once the 3D button was located on the F21.
The "Web" button is now found where once the 3D button was located on the F21.
A FireWire port (i-Link 5400) is located on the front.
A FireWire port (i-Link 5400) is located on the front.
The VPC F22 models gleam in an everyday suitable, matt look.
The VPC F22 models gleam in an everyday suitable, matt look.
Meanwhile, the hardware, in form of Core i7-2630QM and NVIDIA GeForce GT 540M, has been maintained.
Meanwhile, the hardware, in form of Core i7-2630QM and NVIDIA GeForce GT 540M, has been maintained.
Where once fingerprints gathered on the F21,
Where once fingerprints gathered on the F21,
the office fan now finds matt plastic.
the office fan now finds matt plastic.
The workmanship is otherwise equal: stable base unit
The workmanship is otherwise equal: stable base unit
but wobbly lid construction.
but wobbly lid construction.
The hinges are tight, but the frame is fairly stable.
The hinges are tight, but the frame is fairly stable.
The keyboard has a backlight.
The keyboard has a backlight.
It turns on via light sensor or the push of a button.
It turns on via light sensor or the push of a button.
The interfaces partly peek a bit oddly out of the beveled sides (VGA).
The interfaces partly peek a bit oddly out of the beveled sides (VGA).
Sony Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B: The 22 range with office suitable input devices is available for starting at 875 euros. The good display (Vaio Premium Display) is however only installed into the expensive configurations.
Sony Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B: The 22 range with office suitable input devices is available for starting at 875 euros. The good display (Vaio Premium Display) is however only installed into the expensive configurations.

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Links

Compare Prices

Pro

+sRGB color space
+Wide horizontal Viewing angles:
+Anti-glare TFT
+Very good brightness
+Entry level gaming performance
+High application performance
+BluRay burner & an 8 GB RAM
+Illuminated keyboard
+Comparatively resistant case
+Usable battery runtimes
 

Cons

-Loud during load
-Wobbly lid
-Interface positioning
-Few ports
-High temperatures during load

Shortcut

What we like

Top-rate display with a lot of overview for working. Input devices with good, yet not perfect feedback.

What we'd like to see

Better extendability via ExpressCard and eSATA ports

What surprises us

A high contrast of 1007:1 is extremely rare in laptops.

The competition

Full HD screens in 15.6 to 16.4 inches for less than 1500 euros: Dell Latitude E5520 (1230 euros); Dell Precision M4600 workstation (1400 euros); Fujitsu Celsius Mobile H710 (1410 euros); HP EliteBook 8560w (1430 euros); Lenovo ThinkPad W510 (1480 euros); Schenker XMG A501-4OQ (1020 euros); Sony Vaio VPC-F22J1E/B (875 euros, another screen!)

Rating

Sony Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B
08/02/2011 v2
Sebastian Jentsch

Chassis
82%
Keyboard
89%
Pointing Device
85%
Connectivity
71%
Weight
70%
Battery
80%
Display
90%
Games Performance
86%
Application Performance
90%
Temperature
80%
Noise
74%
Add Points
87%
Average
82%
83%
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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > Reviews > Archive of our own reviews > Review Sony Vaio VPC-F22S1E/B (FHD) Notebook
Author: Sebastian Jentsch, 2011-08- 7 (Update: 2013-06- 6)