Review Gigabyte Booktop T1125N & Docking Convertible

Sebastian Jentsch (translated by Liala Stieglitz), 03/24/2011

Multitool. The convertible combines i5, Optimus graphics & four loudspeakers with tablet functionality and in mini format. What's great: The mite mutates to a multifunction desktop replacement via docking station. In face of this, who needs a tablet or a desktop PC?

Gigabyte Booktop T1125N: Subnotebook, tablet and desktop PC in one single device?
Gigabyte Booktop T1125N: Subnotebook, tablet and desktop PC in one single device?

Gigabyte Technologies hasn't belonged to those notebook manufacturers who have engaged themselves massively in Germany until now. The manufacturer's motherboards and graphic cards are more famous. However, alike Asus originating from the same country, the Taiwanese from Gigabyte have started producing notebooks years ago. They have mainly been sold in Asia.

Merely a small number is retailed in Germany's stores, for example the 9 inch Convertible M912V or the UMPC U60 in 2008. Currently, we only find the odd Gigabyte Touch Note T1005M & T1000P with Intel's Atom N550, respectively N470, in stores. These 10.1 inchers are also convertible tablets, but they are not compatible with the presented Booktop docking station of our test device.

The Taiwanese ring in a new strategy with the Booktop T1125N. Instead of a solitary single tablet or subnotebook, a comprehensive desktop replacement solution with docking station and optical drive is offered for almost 1000 euros. The term "desktop replacement" may certainly give a few users an uneasy feeling since neither games nor hardware devouring workstation applications can be managed with the "power" of a Core i5-470UM and an NVIDIA GeForce 310M. Nevertheless, fact is that this performance can likely cover 80% of the home or occupational scenarios.

In this review, we'll check if the seldom seen guest from Taiwan bids a well-built, mobile convertible tablet and a well-conceived docking solution.

Case

Fairly stable case
Fairly stable case
Tight but softly mounted hinge
Tight but softly mounted hinge
Stiff base plate, rigid maintenance cover
Stiff base plate, rigid maintenance cover

The convertible's 11.6 inch case presents itself in a solidly built base unit and a stiff lid made of brushed aluminum. Base unit, wrist-rest (plastic in aluminum looks) and base plate have a praiseworthy torsional stiffness. The same applies to the lid with a rotatable multi-touch display.

The hinge, a challenge in the T1125N in terms of construction, isn't massive. The silver surface is a plastic cover. The hinge keeps the lid firmly in position and even rotating and stop indicate longevity. However the hinges mount on the base unit isn't completely stiff. The latter bends noticeably when we pull on the half turned lid with force. The battery positioned underneath the hinge has prevented a stronger, so better reinforced sub-construction.

The bottom can be opened via the maintenance cover. The 2.5 inch drive, two RAM slots (one empty), the WLAN module and an unoccupied mini PCIe slot is found underneath it. The latter could point at a 3G version since two antennas, a SIM slot and 3G modem software are prepared. The manufacturer's website speaks of a mobile broadband option (3.5G support).

Connectivity

Free full size mini PCIe slot and antennas. Preparation for a 3G module.
Free full size mini PCIe  slot and antennas. Preparation for a 3G module.

A highlight of our test device is the configuration with connections via the docking solution. But the subnotebook itself bids a profound offer of ports with HDMI, 1 USB 3.0 and eSATA. The bottom and front accommodate a total of four speakers, but more on that in "Emissions". The port for the docking solution, GA-T1125, is on the left. Two feed holes on the port's left and right ensure an accurate assembly with the station.

Front: Microphone, headphone
Front: Microphone, headphone
Left: AC, docking port, VGA, eSATA/USB, power slider
Left: AC, docking port, VGA, eSATA/USB, power slider
Rear: SIM card slot
Rear: SIM card slot
Right: Cardreader (SD/MMC/MS/MS Pro), function button, 2 USB 3.0s, HDMI, Kensington
Right: Cardreader (SD/MMC/MS/MS Pro), function button, 2 USB 3.0s, HDMI, Kensington

Communication

The communication modules are contemporary. A GBE Family Controller (Realtek), a draft n WLAN (Atheros AR9285) and a Bluetooth module are installed. The latter works with the old 2.1+EDR standard.

Supplies

Besides the docking solution, GA-T1125 Dock, with its separate optical drive, no supplies other than a warranty card, driver & utility DVD and manual are found in the box. The system isn't overloaded with software. If you'd prefer to stick to the familiar Windows desktop, you'll not even notice Gigabyte's AppPark, or even need it. This small interface bids a central access point to frequently used programs. Not something that can't also be managed with a few desktop links.

The installed 3G modem tool indicates the 3G option (can be optionally bought: 3.5G UMTS/HSPA module from Gigabyte). Both Backup & Restore, as well as Create System Disc, serve data securing, respectively creating recovery data carriers.

Warranty

The manufacturer grants a 24 month warranty on the subnotebook and 12 months on both the battery and docking station. It's recommendable to register online for a smooth claim transaction (warranty S/N on base plate).

Gigabyte AppPark
Gigabyte AppPark
Recovery data carriers
Recovery data carriers
Home theater settings
Home theater settings

Booktop

The Gigabyte T1125N is currently only sold in the Booktop version, so including the docking station GA-T1125 Dock with a slot-in DVD. The optical drive is plugged (eSATA connection) and sold as a bundle with the Dock (199 euros). On the go, the DVD drive turns into a USB drive that doesn't need its own power source.

The T1125N can be inserted on the Dock as a tablet or as a closed subnotebook. The second, smaller bay is for the DVD drive. The variable 90 degree alignment allows cables to be moved out of sight, in case looking at the touchpad should be necessary during desktop utilization. This even makes home theater utilization imaginable.

HDMI and VGA are also looped through the Dock, just like Ethernet, USB 3.0 and audio. Only users of external eSATA hard disks will be unhappy because this port is covered by the dock and it isn't available on the station.

There is an alternative power on button on the Dock since the notebook's power slider is also covered. The subnotebook's battery status can be displayed via status LEDs by pressing the battery symbol immediately beside the power button (5 level indicator). A practical idea. A second, identical adapter is included so that the power cable doesn't have to be removed from the Dock when going in vacation. One of our adapters emitted an annoying whining noise, which is NOT a defect in the series. The customer should be entitled to a replacement in this case.

Gigabyte GA-T1125 Dock, included in the scope of delivery where applicable
Gigabyte GA-T1125 Dock, included in the scope of delivery where applicable
The small bay is for the slot in DVD
The small bay is for the slot in DVD
HDMI, VGA, LAN, line out, mic, 2 USB 2.0s, 2 USB 3.0s
HDMI, VGA, LAN, line out, mic, 2 USB 2.0s, 2 USB 3.0s
A second adapter spares unplugging for trips
A second adapter spares unplugging for trips
Power button for desktop utilization
Power button for desktop utilization
The slot in DVD Super Multi as USB drive in mobile utilization
The slot in DVD Super Multi as USB drive in mobile utilization

Input Devices

Keyboard

The keys in isolation look have a clear gap between them and exploit the entire case breadth. The arrow keys have pleasantly not been minimized, but the return and right shift key have in return. Nevertheless, typos are rare with a bit of practice.

The keyboard's weak point is the unclear pressure point and the soft stroke. It coils in the center key field area during typing. The key bed doesn't fit tight here. Consequently, the typing feel is spongy and doesn't support writing motivation and accuracy very much. When the chassis is bent extremely via its hinge, the inserted keyboard loosens itself at a point from the upper mount. This can be remedied by pressing it down with a finger, but reinforces the clattery impression.

Touchpad

The cursor moves accurately and with clear friction over the desktop (minute knobs). The pad is pleasant to use, when the loud but at least flexible keys (medium stroke length, clear pressure point) are avoided. It is a multi-touch pad (Elan Smart Pad), which detects two finger gestures, e.g. zoom, scroll. Fixed vertical and horizontal scroll fields have been omitted. They cannot be enabled in the Smart Pad software.

Multi-Touch

The capacitive multi-touch pad complies with the latest finger technology, used in all higher quality tablets and smartphones. Our conductive skin is crucial for this. Inputs via a pen (stylus pen), fingernails or other objects don't work (no gloves). Operating is fast and without any start problems. The surface detects when the palm of a hand is laid on it, but doesn't accept any inputs made on other positions.

When the finger is pressed heavily onto the LED screen, pressure marks turn up at the edges and partly under the finger. A fairly careful finger use might be necessary for a long duration of the multi-touch screen. You shouldn't entrust the T1125N in the inept hands of children already in view of the hinges flexibility. The lid, folded over to a tablet, has no mechanical catch apart from the hinge clearly locking.

Many Windows based tablet PCs have a switch for rotating the picture direction, respectively they automatically change the view depending on how it's held. The T1125N isn't capable of this. The Smart Manager Control Center comes into play so that you don't have to click your way through Windows' options. The tool is opened by a silver button on the right and bundles all important energy and application settings. Brightness, energy mode, volume, webcam, external monitors or USB Smart Charge (e.g. charge the iPod) can be set here with a finger. It can even disable multi-touch. However, it doesn't result in a longer battery life.

Keyboard with poor pressure point
Keyboard with poor pressure point
Touchpad with pleasant surface
Touchpad with pleasant surface
Capacitive multi-touch, can be rotated to a tablet PC
Capacitive multi-touch, can be rotated to a tablet PC
Shortcut: Smart Manager Control Center

Display

With exception of the multi-touch quality, there is a simple HD consumer screen in the T1125N. It can only be read out as HF9D2_N116B6 without reference to the manufacturer. The 16:9 HD ready display has a resolution of 1366x768 pixels. A slight anti-reflective treatment is presented. The subtly recognizable coat is for capacitive inputs and not for deterring reflections.

The weak contrast of 183:1 isn't surprising since it's standard for office devices as well as many tablet PCs. The colors lack brilliancy. They look beached. The narrow color spectrum complies with the low contrasts. None of the three comparison color spectrums can be displayed. The T1125N is the colored, interior area in each graph.

T1125N vs. AdobeRGB(t)
T1125N vs. AdobeRGB(t)
T1125Nvs. sRGB(t)
T1125Nvs. sRGB(t)
T1125Nvs. Vaio EB4X(t)
T1125Nvs. Vaio EB4X(t)
207
cd/m²
199
cd/m²
197
cd/m²
199
cd/m²
207
cd/m²
204
cd/m²
195
cd/m²
211
cd/m²
205
cd/m²
Distribution of brightness
Information
Gossen Mavo-Monitor
Maximum: 211 cd/m²
Average: 202.7 cd/m²
Brightness Distribution: 92 %
Center on Battery: 189 cd/m²
Black: 1.13 cd/m²
Contrast: 183:1

The 11.6 inch display's LED backlight lights the panel up to 211 cd/m2 at most. That is very sufficient for indoors. The average rate is 203 cd/m2. The illumination of 92% is very even.

A satisfying outdoor use is almost impossible with the reflective display. Reflections are already clearly disturbing in heavily overcast conditions (see pictures). In addition, the display automatically dims to 189 cd/m2 in battery mode (center). Thus, the T1125N isn't suitable for its big appearance in the summer outdoor restaurant.

Frontal view, heavily overcast
Frontal view, heavily overcast
Lateral view, heavily overcast
Lateral view, heavily overcast
Frontal view, reflections
Frontal view, reflections

The tight viewing angle stability speaks the language of a simple consumer TFT. Colors already falsify at narrow angles of about 45 degrees horizontally. However, writing remains well legible up to about 80 degrees. Image deviations, seen as dimming (bottom) or bleaching (top), turn up at only 15 degrees vertically. This is aggravating during tablet PC use because you often look upon the screen in a 45 degree angle.

Viewing angles: Gigabyte Booktop T1125N
Viewing angles: Gigabyte Booktop T1125N

Performance

Gigabyte uses a Core i5-470UM (32 nm, Arrandale). It is a typical low voltage CPU with a basic clock rate of 2x1.33 GHz and a TDP of 18 watts (UM models). The turbo function can boost the single core rate up to 1.86 GHz. Hyper Threading is more significant for multi core applications in practical use (four computing threads). If you'd like to save 100 euros, you can get the T1125N with a Core i3-380UM, as well.

Alike all i5 cores, the 470UM has a memory controller for a DDR3 main memory and an Intel HD graphics card installed. The 2GB RAM is located on one of two slots. Serial devices are however equipped with 4GB. Upgrading is easy via the base plate. There is room for a 2.5 inch notebook HDD in the case. In our case, it comes from Western Digital (WD5000BEVT-22A0RT0, 500 GB, 5400 rpm).

The Intel GMA is complemented by a dedicated NVIDIA GeForce 310M with a 512 MB video memory. Nvidia's Optimus technology allows the 310M to be disabled automatically, when its computing power isn't needed. The Intel HD always remains enabled because its frame buffer is used for video output. As a result, there aren't any annoying waiting times or black screens during switching.

System info CPUZ CPU
System info CPUZ Cache
System info CPUZ Mainboard
System info CPUZ RAM
System info CPUZ RAM SPD
System info GPUZ Geforce 310M
System info GPUZ Intel HD
DPC Latency Checker: Idle, hardly any latencies
DPC Latency Checker: WLAN on/off, short latencies
 
System information: Gigabyte Booktop T1125N

We've checked the Core i5-470UM's performance with Cinebench R10 Single 64 bit, among others. The synthetic processor benchmark rewards the 470UM (2x1.33 GHz, 2436 points) with a performance on par with a Core i5-520UM (2x1.06 GHz, 2435 points). The 470UM and 520UM have an identical turbo rate of 1.86 GHz.

The Core i5 shows its strength in calculations with all available cores (Hyper Threading: 2 cores + 2 virtual cores). Cinebench R10 Multi (64 bit) finishes with strong 5036 points (520UM = 4179; i3-330M = 6600; i5-430M = 7800). The higher base rate supplies a small advantage in comparison to the 520UM. Strong notebook CPUs, such as an i5-480M (~8550 points) calculate a lot faster, but they also emit more waste heat (under load).

3.4
Windows 7 Experience Index
Processor
Calculations per second
5.6
Memory (RAM)
Memory operations per second
5.5
Graphics
Desktop performance for Windows Aero
3.4
Gaming graphics
3D business and gaming graphics
5.9
Primary hard disk
Disk data transfer rate
5.7
Cinebench R10 Rendering Single 32Bit
1967
Cinebench R10 Rendering Multiple CPUs 32Bit
4255
Cinebench R10 Shading 32Bit
3164
Cinebench R10 Rendering Single CPUs 64Bit
2436 Points
Cinebench R10 Rendering Multiple CPUs 64Bit
5036 Points
Cinebench R10 Shading 64Bit
3211 Points
Cinebench R11.5 OpenGL 64Bit
8.58 fps
Cinebench R11.5 CPU Multi 64Bit
1.35 Points
Help
PC Mark
PCMark Vantage3883 points
Help
PCMark Vantage in comparison
Sony SV-S1311G4E (min)
 2350M, HD Graphics 3000
811
   ...
Sony Vaio VPC-EH3C0E/W
 B960, HD Graphics (Sandy Bridge)
3874
Apple MacBook Pro 15 inch 2009-06
 T9600, GeForce 9600M GT
3879
Acer Aspire 5935G
 T9550, GeForce GT 130M
3882
Gigabyte Booktop T1125N
 470UM, GeForce 310M
3883
Apple MacBook Pro 13 inch 2010-04 2.66 GHz
 P8800, GeForce 320M
3888
Toshiba Satellite P300-212
 T9550, Mobility Radeon HD 4650
3892
HP ProBook 455 G1 H6P57EA
 A4-4300M, Radeon HD 7420G
3893
   ...
One K56-3F (max)
 4700MQ, GeForce GT 750M
23558

We experience the overall performance as smooth. Several simultaneously running programs don't put the T1125N under pressure. PCMark Vantage checks the interplay of CPU, graphics, RAM and hard disk. The result is 3883 points. Thus, the convertible is below that of an Acer Aspire 1830T (520UM), but above that of an Acer Travelmate 8172T (330UM). Nevertheless, the 470UM system is remote from standard processors as found in Sony's Vaio VPC-S13X9E (i3-370M, 13.3 inch, 5088 points).

The GeForce 310M's (512 MB DDR3) main task is to support the processor in HD decoding (H.264, MPEG-2, MPEG-4 etc.) and video coding (CUDA, OpenCL). It's doubtful if users really need the latter in an 11.6 incher. However, such a GPU makes sense for rendering Full HD movies. The 310M's CUDA support can be exploited in programs like Badaboom. But OpenCL programmers will definitely not buy a T1125M.

Any hope of gaming performance has to be stifled with 3622 3DMarks 2006 (1755 CPU score). At least this score is better than the Intel HD would achieve (about 1100 points). Nevertheless, the outdated 310M is remote from the performance of the latest midrange Radeon HD 6550 (depending on CPU, about 6800 to 7400 points).

3D Mark
3DMark 06
 1280x1024
3622 points
Help
WDC Scorpio Blue WD5000BEVT-22A0RT0
Transfer Rate Minimum: 20.1 MB/s
Transfer Rate Maximum: 77.7 MB/s
Transfer Rate Average: 60.6 MB/s
Access Time: 18 ms
Burst Rate: 80.6 MB/s
CPU Usage: 1 %

PCMark Vantage's subtotal only adds up to 2690 points. A good average for a 5400 rpm hard disk would be around 3500.  The HDTune scores turn out accordingly low. The throughput in sequential read is 61 MB/s.

Crystal Disk Mark uses a different routine and gives a more detailed report about the read/write throughputs of small and large data packages. The small figures during reading and writing of random 4K packages are striking (0.5 / 0.9 MB/s). A faster 7200 rpm HDD accomplishes 0.8 / 1.7 MB/s in this exercise (ST9500420AS in the HP 4720s).

WDC WD5000BEVT-22A0RT0, 500GB
WDC WD5000BEVT-22A0RT0, 500GB
HD Tune 61 MB/s read
HD Tune 61 MB/s read
Crystal Disk Mark 68/67 MB/s read/write
Crystal Disk Mark 68/67 MB/s read/write

Emissions

Luftauslass
Luftauslass

System Noise

Such a subnotebook, convertible and tablet PC should stay pleasantly quiet in the ideal case. This can only be said about the T1125 in idle or low load. The fan rotates with a noise level of 31.2 dB(A) during surfing, emailing, or typing. It occasionally turns itself off completely (long idle periods), whereas the HDD's quiet noise remains audible as a subtle whirring with 31.7 dB(A).

The level increases to a noisy 44.4 dB(A) when the i5-470UM and the GeForce 310M is put under permanent load with Prime95 or Furmark. This maximum level stays consistent, but it sounds like a rocket engine. When only 3DMark06 loads the graphics, the level falls to 40.8 dB(A). This audible, but still endurable level can be mainly expected when a game is played on the T1125N. The fan management is overall refined and considered when the speeds are changed.

Noise Level

Idle 31.2 / 31.2 / 31.2 dB(A)
HDD 31.7 dB(A)
Load 40.8 / 44.4 dB(A)
 
    30 dB
silent
40 dB
audible
50 dB
loud
 
min: , med: , max:    Voltcraft sl-320 (15 cm distance)
Stress test: CPU maximum 81 degrees
Stress test: CPU maximum 81 degrees

Temperature

The T1125N gets at most lukewarm during a scenario of short load and long idle states. The number pad increases to a maximum of 32 degrees. The warmest spot on the bottom is 40 degrees in the CPU area. The other areas stay considerably cooler.

We measure 33 degrees Celsius on the wrist-rest after a stress test. The maximum on the work surface is 37 degrees. The bottom heats up selectively to 47 degrees in this case. However, the average is only 32 degrees due to the otherwise cooler areas.

Max. Load
 29.6 °C33.6 °C34.7 °C 
 29.5 °C34.9 °C37 °C 
 25.9 °C32.6 °C31.7 °C 
Maximum: 37 °C
Average: 32.2 °C
47.6 °C31.8 °C26.6 °C
39.5 °C32.3 °C27.6 °C
29.1 °C29.1 °C27.2 °C
Maximum: 47.6 °C
Average: 32.3 °C
Power Supply (max.)  46.7 °C | Room Temperature 19.3 °C | Voltcraft IR-360

Speakers

The 11.6 incher comes with a total of four small speakers in sound issues. Two speakers, marked as tweeters, are located on the narrow front. The two woofers have been placed beside the rear feet. The latter develop their potential the best when the T1125N rests on the Docking. They would otherwise emit their sound toward the table.

The praised THX sound enhancements (Surround, Crystalizer, Speaker, Dialog Plus) can actually produce a balanced sound in the midranges and trebles. However, they can't provide basses or low pitches. If it is connected to the TV, its speakers, respectively an external system should be used for the sound output. The volume always remains undistorted, even in the maximum level.

Battery Life

The T1125N's battery life is 3:11 hours in WLAN surfing and a brightness of 100 cd/m2 (191 minutes). We loaded only a few YouTube clips and visited news sites in this time. Our test determined 156 minutes in the DVD test. However, we didn't use the external DVD drive, but played an Avi movie from the hard disk.

If you are very frugal and work without WLAN in the lowest brightness setting, you can draw well four hours with maximum energy savings. The maximum – but unrealistic – runtime (BatteryEater Reader's Test) is 256 minutes. The 7800 mAh battery is ready for the next session after 3:25 hours. This is how long the battery needs for recharging after a complete discharge.

The battery life could possibly be increased with a few settings in the bios. The following functions or devices can definitely be disabled: WLAN, Bluetooth, 3G, webcam, USB 3.0, Turbo Boost, Nvidia Optimus 310M, Intel VGA performance.

Charging: 207 min
Charging: 207 min
WLAN surfing: 191 min
WLAN surfing: 191 min
Avi movie: 156 min
Avi movie: 156 min
Load: 97 min
Load: 97 min
Idle: 256 min
Idle: 256 min
Battery Runtime
Idle (without WLAN, min brightness)
4h 16min
WiFi Surfing
3h 11min
DVD
2h 36min
Load (maximum brightness)
1h 37min

The tight battery life, for subnotebook conditions, is due to a slightly increased power consumption. The measurements at the power socket (battery capacity at 100%) show 11.8 to 17.7 watts in idle. In comparison, a Lenovo IdeaPad U260 needs 6.8 up to 12.2 watts, a Dell Vostro V130 consumes 10 to 14 watts. Both comparison systems have the same i5-470UM processor.

The power consumption alters considerably under load. When the i5-470UM is solely loaded by the processor stress test, the multimeter indicates 41.6 watts. When Furmark is added, the power consumption increases to 61.5 watts. 3DMark06 alone consumes 48.1 watts. The Geforce 310M is definitely the cause for this in the T1125N. Similar systems with only an Intel HD consume about 30 watts (stress test): Acer Aspire 1830T (520UM) needs 30.3 watts; Vostro V130 needs 29 watts.

Power Consumption

Off / Standby 0.6 / 1 Watt
Idle 11.8 / 16.4 / 17.7 Watt
Load 48.1 / 61.5 Watt
 
Key: min: , med: , max:         Voltcraft VC 960

Verdict

The concept is successful. A PC-complete package runs into the German harbors for a bit less than 1000 euros with the Booktop T1125N. It still is a unique solution for avoiding secondary or tertiary PC in this price range. Users have a flexible device for all purposes at hand with the T1125N.

The T1125N is a high resolution tablet PC, even if weight and bulkiness make it a bit unhandy in its use. It is a handy subnotebook, although with a limited battery life of well three hours. It is a small sized desktop replacement with many interfaces and optical drive, when it's placed on its Docking. And finally, in the docking position, the T1125N is also an entertainer aka Home Theater PC (HTPC) with four speakers, THX sound effects and touchscreen.

The T1125N will be first choice for some users since data synchronization and switching among three device categories isn't necessary. The Booktop's potential buyer shouldn't be a fan of high performance CPUs and gaming. The Optimus graphics, Geforce 310M, and the Core i5-470UM (low voltage) just does not have enough computing power for this purpose. But if you don't render videos, play the latest games or edit enormous Gimp files, you'll find the work speed pleasantly smooth.

The downsides are found in the spongy keyboard, the fairly short battery life and the weak contrasts as well as the narrow viewing angles of the screen. The (still) omitted 3G module appears to be in preparation since the full size mini PCIe, two antennas, a SIMCard slot and 3G modem software are all set. An upgrade option may become possible.

Gigabyte Booktop T1125N with GA-T1125 Dock and slot-in DVD: A successful multitool with acceptable shortcomings
Gigabyte Booktop T1125N with GA-T1125 Dock and slot-in DVD: A successful multitool with acceptable shortcomings
In Review: Gigabyte Booktop T1125N, by courtesy of SIMAC Electronics Handel GmbH (Gigabyte distributor)
In Review: Gigabyte Booktop T1125N, by courtesy of SIMAC Electronics Handel GmbH (Gigabyte distributor)

Specifications

Gigabyte Booktop T1125N

:: Processor
:: Mainboard
Intel HM55
:: Memory
4096 MB, PC3-10700 667MHz
:: Graphics adapter
NVIDIA GeForce 310M - 512 MB, Core: 606 MHz, Memory: 790 MHz, Nvidia Optimus, ForceWare 259.30
:: Display
11.6 inch 16:9, 1366x768 pixel, HF9D2_N116B6, capacitive multi-touch touchscreen, glossy: yes
:: Harddisk
WDC Scorpio Blue WD5000BEVT-22A0RT0, 500 GB 5400 rpm 500 GB
:: Soundcard
Realtek ALC269 @ Intel Ibex Peak PCH
:: Connections
2 USB 2.0, 1 USB 3.0, 1 VGA, 1 HDMI, 1 Kensington Lock, 1 eSata, Audio Connections: Line-Out, Mikrofon, Card Reader: SD/MMC/MS/MS Pro, docking port
:: Networking
Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller (10/100/1000MBit), Atheros AR9285 Wireless Network Adapter (b g n ), 2.1+EDR Bluetooth
:: Size
height x width x depth (in mm): 30.5 x 265 x 191
:: Weight
1.757 kg Power Supply: 0.216 kg
:: Battery
58 Wh Lithium-Ion, 7.4V 7800mAh 6-Zellen
:: Price
999 Euro
:: Operating System
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64 Bit
:: Additional features
Webcam: 1.3MP, docking station & slot-in-DVD Super Multi Dual Layer, webcam tool, 3G modem tool, Backup & Restore, Create System Disc, THX Audio tool, 24 Months Warranty, Docking station GA-T1125 Dock, slot-in-DVD was included in scope of delivery. Please inquire at purchase, if necessary. optional: 3.5G UMTS/HSPA module from Gigabyte

 

Are we now reviewing ATX motherboards?
Are we now reviewing ATX motherboards?
A SIMCard slot is available, but not working.
A SIMCard slot is available, but not working.
The case made of plastic and aluminum (lid) is surprisingly stiff.
The case made of plastic and aluminum (lid) is surprisingly stiff.
The double-locked battery fits just as tight.
The double-locked battery fits just as tight.
It has a high capacity of 58 watt hours.
It has a high capacity of 58 watt hours.
Inside, the 2 GB RAM can easily be upgraded to 4 GB.
Inside, the 2 GB RAM can easily be upgraded to 4 GB.
The same applies to the hard disk in a standard 2.5 inch size.
The same applies to the hard disk in a standard 2.5 inch size.
What does this "Booktop" actually mean?
What does this "Booktop" actually mean?
The fairly strong 11.6 incher
The fairly strong 11.6 incher
turns into a small desktop replacement or even living PC
turns into a small desktop replacement or even living PC
in its docking station GA-T1125.
in its docking station GA-T1125.
The 90 degree shift pushes the cable out of sight.
The 90 degree shift pushes the cable out of sight.
The slot-in DVD fits upright into the docking station.
The slot-in DVD fits upright into the docking station.
Clever: The DVD drive is connected "internally" via eSATA and not via USB.
Clever: The DVD drive is connected "internally" via eSATA and not via USB.
The USB drive stores its short USB cable in its bottom
The USB drive stores its short USB cable in its bottom
just like a webcam.
just like a webcam.
Of course, a cardreader hasn't been omitted,
Of course, a cardreader hasn't been omitted,
in the Gigabyte GA-T1125 Dock (price for a single Dock: 199 euros).
in the Gigabyte GA-T1125 Dock (price for a single Dock: 199 euros).
Of course not. The Taiwanese manufacturer, Gigabyte,
Of course not. The Taiwanese manufacturer, Gigabyte,
is a seldom seen guest.
is a seldom seen guest.
Only a few shops list the test device, T1125N.
Only a few shops list the test device, T1125N.
But the 11.6 incher isn't at all bad.
But the 11.6 incher isn't at all bad.
The subnotebook even has unique features.
The subnotebook even has unique features.
It turns into a tablet PC within seconds via the rotatable display.
It turns into a tablet PC within seconds via the rotatable display.
Well, if that's not a promising strategy?
Well, if that's not a promising strategy?
Core i5-470UM, Optimus graphics and USB 3.0 –
Core i5-470UM, Optimus graphics and USB 3.0 –
that's just as impressive as a 500 GB memory
that's just as impressive as a 500 GB memory
and the THX sound enhancements.
and the THX sound enhancements.
Incredible, but true: Four speakers emit their sound out of the 11.6 incher.
Incredible, but true: Four speakers emit their sound out of the 11.6 incher.
Two woofer (rear) and two tweeters (front).
Two woofer (rear) and two tweeters (front).
The connections range from eSATA up to
The connections range from eSATA up to
a real docking port. It finds its partner
a real docking port. It finds its partner
Two adapters? One for the subnotebook, and an identical one for the dock.
Two adapters? One for the subnotebook, and an identical one for the dock.

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Pro

+Dockin solution with many interfaces
+Desktop replacement with touch operation
+eSATA & USB 3.0 on the device
+Tablet& subnotebook option
+Smart Manager button
+THX sound with 4 loudspeakers
+Viable performance
+Solid case
+Prepared for 3G module
+2 RAM bays, free mini PCIe
 

Cons

-Loud during load
-Narrow viewing angles
-Low contrasts & weak colors
-Touchscreen not AR coated
-Tight battery life
-Tight, yet yielding hinge
-Spongy keyboard
-No eSATA on Dock

Shortcut

What we like

A docking solution that puts an end to annoying cable tangles. The upright Dock makes room on the desk, the touch operation gleams in entertainment use.

What we'd like to see

Now only the 3G module and the (almost) perfect multitool is complete.

What surprises us

It's just too bad that a spongy keyboard is a hitch in an actually solid device.

The competition

Fujitsu LifeBook T580 Convertible 10 inch: Similar qualities but without docking option (starts at 1130 euros); Fujitu Lifebook T4410 12 inch: Discontinued model with Core 2 Duo T6570; HP EliteBook 2740p 12 inch: Strong performance, docking station costs extra (starts at 1385 euros); HP Touchsmart tm2-2100eg: inexpensive, without dock, few offers; Toshiba Portégé M780-10G: 12 inch pro tool, but expensive; Lenovo IdeaPad S10-3t: only 400 euros, but the weakest netbook performance; Panasonic Toughbook CF-C1: robust, light, docking port, costs more than 2000 euros.

Rating

Gigabyte Booktop T1125N
03/17/2011 v2
Sebastian Jentsch

Chassis
87%
Keyboard
75%
Pointing Device
82%
Connectivity
82%
Weight
90%
Battery
79%
Display
72%
Games Performance
65%
Application Performance
78%
Temperature
85%
Noise
84%
Add Points
95%
Average
81%
83%
Convertible *
Weighted Average

> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > Reviews > Archive of our own reviews > Review Gigabyte Booktop T1125N & Docking Convertible
Author: Sebastian Jentsch, 2011-03-24 (Update: 2013-06- 6)