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Windows 10 devices based on Snapdragon SoCs are reportedly in development

Windows 10 devices based on Snapdragon SoCs are reportedly in development
Windows 10 devices based on Snapdragon SoCs are reportedly in development
The new Qualcomm Microsoft Alliance is rumored to be working diligently on Snapdragon 835-based Windows systems for a launch sometime in the second half of 2017.

Microsoft's recent announcement at the WinHEC conference in Shenzhen about a Qualcomm alliance is purportedly receiving positive feedback from the industry. According to supplier sources close to DigiTimes, manufacturers are already hard at work on building smaller energy-saving PC designs with LTE connectivity for a launch in the latter half of 2017. These machines are expected to run on Snapdragon SoCs as opposed to "proper" x86-based processors.

Despite the high hopes for more ARM-based Windows products, we may not see any ARM-based Windows 10 systems on show at CES 2017. Nonetheless, the lower power consumption and cheaper manufacturing costs of ARM processors should lead to unique passively-cooled designs at more affordable prices.

Microsoft's previous attempt at an ARM-based Windows tablet failed as the Windows RT platform lacked lasting support from both manufacturers and developers. A return to ARM shows the company's insistence on expanding upon the "Internet of Things" concept and to increase the presence of Windows in a mobile market dominated by ARM, Android, and iOS.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 12 > Windows 10 devices based on Snapdragon SoCs are reportedly in development
Allen Ngo, 2016-12-21 (Update: 2016-12-21)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.