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The Mali-C71 is ARM's first ISP for the automotive market

ARM Mali-C71 ISP for automotive applications
ARM Mali-C71
This new chip was built from scratch for the automotive market, its list of features including high dynamic range, noise reduction, advanced error detection, low-latency processing, and more.

Yesterday, ARM unveiled a new Mali chip. This time, we are not talking about a hardware part for smartphones or tablets, but the company's first image signal processor designed specifically for the automotive industry.

ARM Mali-C71 comes as the first result of last year purchase that added imaging and embedded computer vision company Apical and its assets to ARM's portfolio. Mali-C71 is a software-controlled hardware block that can deliver up to 1.2 Gpixel/s, being able to interface with up to four cameras. The image bit streams produced can be used to drive a display, but can also provide data to an artificial intelligence-powered system to enable motion estimation and object recognition. 

According to ARM, the Mali-C71 has been designed with functional safety in mind, being compliant with ASIL D / ISO 26262 and SIL3 / IEC 61508. This chip comes with over 300 fault detection circuits, built-in self-test, cyclic redundancy checking, and more.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 04 > The Mali-C71 is ARM's first ISP for the automotive market
Codrut Nistor, 2017-04-25 (Update: 2017-04-25)
Codrut Nistor
Codrut Nistor - News Editor
Although I have been writing about new software and hardware for almost a decade, I consider myself to be old school. I always enjoy listening to music on CD or tape instead of digital files and I will not even get into the touchscreen vs physical keys debate. However, I also enjoy new technology, as I now have the chance to take a look at the future every day. I joined the Notebookcheck crew back in 2013 and I have no plans to leave the ship anytime soon.