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Samsung already mocking smartphones with no audio jack

Samsung already mocking smartphones with no audio jack
Samsung already mocking smartphones with no audio jack
The slight jab during the Galaxy Note 7 presentation was clearly aimed at Lenovo and the speculation surrounding Apple's upcoming iPhone refresh and its potential Lightning-only port.

It didn't take long for Samsung to begin bad-mouthing the competition. Senior Vice President of Samsung Electronics of America Justin Denison was onstage to officially unveil the Galaxy Note 7 and he couldn't help but to explicitly mention that the phablet would include a standard 3.5 mm audio jack. The audience gave an audible chuckle as Denison was clearly implying that some recent and upcoming competitors like the Moto Z and iPhone 7 do not or will not carry the port. He didn't mention them by name, of course, but the message was quite clear nonetheless.

Speculation about the iPhone 6S successor has been leaning towards a model with no conventional 3.5 mm audio jack. Instead, Apple will launch a new series of Beats earphones with a Lightning connector alongside the reveal of the iPhone 7. An alleged production model was recently leaked showing that the earphones would not be compatible with Apple tablets and smartphones running anything lower than iOS 10.

Dropping the audio jack would supposedly bring thinner and lighter designs. The Moto Z, for example, is one of the thinnest consumer smartphones available at just 5.2 mm thick.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 08 > Samsung already mocking smartphones with no audio jack
Ronald Tiefenthäler/ Allen Ngo, 2016-08- 7 (Update: 2017-09-26)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.