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Samsung Galaxy A5 2017 is already outselling its predecessor in South Korea

Samsung Galaxy A5 2017 is already outselling its predecessor in South Korea
Samsung Galaxy A5 2017 is already outselling its predecessor in South Korea
The Galaxy A5 is not coming to the U.S. and is only available for pre-order in parts of Europe, but it is already selling like hotcakes in its home region.

Samsung's middle-class 2017 Galaxy A5 is purportedly selling 2.5x faster than the 2016 Galaxy A5 did at launch according to Korea Times. The 2017 model has been selling about 5000 units per day since it launched in South Korea early January.

The higher sales may be attributed to the worldwide recall of the Galaxy Note 7 as the Galaxy A5 can be seen as a cheaper alternative for Samsung purists. The Galaxy S8 is expected to be announced at MWC 2017 for a potential launch by this April if recent rumors prove to be true.

The new 2017 Galaxy A5 is Samsung's mainstream offering at about 430 Euros. It brings water and dust resistance to the Galaxy A series for the first time while still managing to fit in a faster octa-core processor, more RAM (3 GB) and storage space (32 GB), better 16 MP front and rear cameras, Bluetooth 4.2, USB Type-C, and a larger capacity 3000 mAh battery. Its chassis borrows heavily from the pricier flagship Galaxy S7 series.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 02 > Samsung Galaxy A5 2017 is already outselling its predecessor in South Korea
Allen Ngo, 2017-02- 2 (Update: 2017-02- 2)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.