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CES 2020 | SK Hynix Gold P31 and Platinum P31 PCIe NVMe SSDs coming with 128-layer 4D NAND flash

SK Hynix launches Gold P31 and Platinum P31 PCIe NVMe SSDs with 4D NAND flash (Source: SK Hynix)
SK Hynix launches Gold P31 and Platinum P31 PCIe NVMe SSDs with 4D NAND flash (Source: SK Hynix)
The Platinum P31 will be one of the first consumer SSDs with 128-layer 4D NAND flash to offer sequential read and write rates of 3500 MB/s and 3200 MB/s, respectively.
Allen Ngo, 🇩🇪

Open up your laptop or desktop PC and chances are good that you have storage or RAM chips from SK Hynix. The South Korean memory manufacturer is announcing two M.2 PCI NVMe SSDs at CES this week called the Gold P31 and Platinum P31. Both will be built with vertically stacked 128-layer 4D NAND flash modules and run on SK Hynix's in-house controllers.

SK Hynix says the high-end series of SSDs will target performance users and PC gamers. Most high-end gaming laptops, for example, come equipped with Samsung PM981 NVMe SSDs and so the Gold P31 or Platinum P31 will give OEMs and custom builders another option.

There is no word yet on when we can expect the drives to become available, but the manufacturer is planning to offer the slower Gold P31 model ahead of the faster Platinum P31 later this year. Meanwhile, the SATA III-based Gold S31 is already available for entry-level users.

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Allen Ngo, 2020-01- 7 (Update: 2020-01- 2)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.