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Roccat unveils lightweight Cross gaming headset for 70 Euros

Roccat unveils lightweight Cross gaming headset for 70 Euros
Roccat unveils lightweight Cross gaming headset for 70 Euros
The all-in-one headset weighs in at just 185 grams with a detachable microphone for easier use on smartphones up to desktop PCs.

The Roccat Cross aims to be a portable headset fit for both gaming and on-the-go music. Traditional gaming headsets like the Corsair Void are much larger and aren't meant for street use, but the Cross ships with detachable dual 3.5 mm microphone plugs to reduce weight and size for when microphone functionality is not needed.

As for sound quality, the modular headset utilizes a pair of 50 mm neodymium magnets with ergonomically-tuned ear cushions made of memory foam. Indeed, the Roccat headset carries the same frequency response (20 - 20k Hz) and impedance levels (32 Ω speakers, 2.2k Ω microphone) as the larger Corsair Void. The connecting arch of the headset is made of synthetic leather for a final weight of just 185 grams.

The Cross will retail for 70 Euros when it launches on December 8. Unfortunately, there appears to be no wireless Bluetooth version, so owners of an iPhone 7, iPhone 7 Plus, or Moto Z may be out of luck. The Apple AirPods have yet to launch while Sony's own Xperia Ear equivalent are already in stores.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 11 > Roccat unveils lightweight Cross gaming headset for 70 Euros
Allen Ngo, 2016-11-17 (Update: 2016-11-18)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.