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'OpenCore Computer' advertises pre-built Hackintosh computers that break Apple's EULA

The OpenCore Computer system is claimed to be available as a pre-made Hackintosh. (Source: OpenCore Computers)
The OpenCore Computer system is claimed to be available as a pre-made Hackintosh. (Source: OpenCore Computers)
A new website advertising pre-built Hackintoshes could soon fall foul of Apple's legal team. Their Ryzen systems go against Apple's EULA and precedent has been set in the past regarding shutting down commercial Hackintosh builds. This might not be the only stumbling block if other concerns turn out to be authentic.
Craig Ward,

Editor’s note: Prior to publishing, we want to be clear that we have had no press contact with OpenCore Computer. We raise concerns below about their business, but we can’t confirm the validity of their product. Please apply due diligence when looking through their material.

Creating a Hackintosh (running macOS on hardware not designed by Apple) has been a popular enthusiast hobby over the last decade and a half. This activity is driven by the desire to run Apple’s software without paying for premium hardware or having the ability to plan and create a custom build.

Now, a new website called OpenCore Computer (OCC) ⁠— not associated with the OpenCore bootloader ⁠— has started advertising pre-assembled Hackintoshes that dual boot macOS 10.15 Catalina and Windows 10 Pro out of the box. Supposed configuration options include high-end Ryzen processors, plenty of RAM, and various AMD graphics cards. Two further setups are claimed to be in development that will bring AMD Threadripper and higher RAM support.

However, there are some areas of concern that need addressing. Apple doesn’t allow macOS installation on non-Apple hardware, and Apple could come down heavily on OCC because they’re trying to profit from breaking the licencing agreement. If this were the case, any support and warranties would likely disappear with the website.

Another worry is the bitcoin-only payment method. MacRumors' original article suggests that OCC might only be accepting payment via bitcoin as an attempt to find a loophole. Still, it is hard to deny that the convoluted escrow system involving cryptocurrency is unusual. Cryptocurrencies lack the dispute/refund options available via PayPal, banks, or credit card providers.

Finally, the Acidanthera team behind the OpenCore bootloader has released a strongly worded statement via MacRumors saying that they have nothing to do with OCC and that they’re using their name and logo without permission. “…it is shocking and disgusting that some dishonest people we do not even know dare to use the name and logo of our bootloader, OpenCore, as a matter of promotion in some illicit criminal scam.”

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2020 06 > 'OpenCore Computer' advertises pre-built Hackintosh computers that break Apple's EULA
Craig Ward, 2020-06-14 (Update: 2020-06-14)
Craig Ward
Craig Ward - News Editor
I grew up in a family surrounded by technology, starting with my father loading up games for me on a Commodore 64, and later on a 486. In the late 90's and early 00's I started learning how to tinker with Windows, while also playing around with Linux distributions, both of which gave me an interest for learning how to make software do what you want it to do, and modifying settings that aren't normally user accessible. After this I started building my own computers, and tearing laptops apart, which gave me an insight into hardware and how it works in a complete system. Now keeping up with the latest in hardware and software news is a passion of mine.