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Nubia N1 Lite smartphone now available for 160 Euros

Nubia N1 Lite smartphone now available for 160 Euros
Nubia N1 Lite smartphone now available for 160 Euros
ZTE's already wide selection of budget smartphones has gotten even larger with the new N1 Lite. The smartphone offers a large 5.5-inch display, attractive Black and Gold design, and even a fingerprint reader for an entry-level price.

The affordable ZTE Nubia N1 Lite comes in a sleekly designed matte chassis with the following specifications:

  • 5.5-inch 2.5D HD display
  • Quad-core MediaTek MT6737 SoC
  • ARM Mali-T720 MP2 GPU
  • 2 GB RAM
  • 16 GB eMMC w/ MicroSD support up to 32 GB
  • 8 MP f/2.0 rear camera w/ dual LED Flash
  • 5 MP f/2.8 84-degree wide front camera
  • Non-removable 3000 mAh battery
  • Rear fingerprint sensor

The N1 Lite focuses on ease-of-use with its wide-angle front camera for painless selfies, "Selfie-Beauty" feature for automatic touch-ups, and a fast 0.3-second rear fingerprint sensor for fast unlocking,

ZTE also unveiled the 5.5-inch M2 Lite last week that is the higher-end version of the new N1 Lite. This particular model will have a Full HD display with more RAM, higher resolution cameras, and more internal storage space. Though the launch price of the M2 Lite has not been announced, it will surely cost more than the N1 Lite at just 160 Euros.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 03 > Nubia N1 Lite smartphone now available for 160 Euros
Allen Ngo, 2017-03-30 (Update: 2017-03-31)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.