Notebookcheck

Nubia Z11 camera falls short of the latest iPhone and Nexus smartphones

Nubia Z11 camera falls short of the latest iPhone and Nexus smartphones
Nubia Z11 camera falls short of the latest iPhone and Nexus smartphones
The Sony Exmor RS IMX298 camera in the Z11 is slower with more image noise according to tests from DxOMark.

The 5.5-inch Nubia Z11 smartphone was one of the highlights of IFA 2016. The smartphone features a nearly border-free edge-to-edge display and integrates a Sony Exmor RS IMX298 rear camera. Camera analysts at DxOMark have taken an interest at the Nubia Z11 and the results are purportedly quite impressive.

According to the source, the IMX298 CMOS in the Z11 is small at just 6.5 mm (1/2.8") in diagonal and 1.12 square micrometers. Nonetheless, the camera holds up relatively well when under dimly lit conditions.

The final tallies from DxOMark are 80/100 points and 72/100 points for camera quality and video quality, respectively. In comparison, the Sony IMX378 camera for the Google Pixel was able to score 89 points and 88 points in the same camera and video tests, respectively. DxOMark criticized both the inaccurate white balance and the presence of more image noise on pictures taken with the Nubia Z11. Meanwhile, video mode suffers from color temperature shifting, lack of OIS (optimal image stabilization), and a slow response time to changes in ambient lighting.

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team! Indian citizens welcome!

Currently wanted: 
News and Editorial Editor - Details here

Source(s)

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 02 > Nubia Z11 camera falls short of the latest iPhone and Nexus smartphones
Allen Ngo, 2017-02- 2 (Update: 2017-02- 2)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.