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NVIDIA quietly introduces the GeForce GT 1010 — A Pascal GP108 GPU with 256 CUDA cores, 2 GB GDDR5 VRAM, and 30 W TDP

The NVIDIA GeForce GT 1010 is official but not yet available. (Image: GT 1030)
The NVIDIA GeForce GT 1010 is official but not yet available. (Image: GT 1030)
NVIDIA appears to have silently announced a GeForce GT 1010 GPU earlier this week. The GT 1010 is a Pascal card featuring the 14 nm GP108 GPU similar to the GT 1030. The GT 1010 has only 256 CUDA cores enabled, supports 2 GB GDDR5 VRAM, and has a TDP of 30 W. Availability information is not known yet.

Update (01/18): TechPowerUp has updated their specifications to indicate the TDP as 30 W, which is about the same as the GT 1030. The same has been updated in the headline, abstract, and the article. Readers may kindly note.

NVIDIA is apparently not fully done and dusted with the Pascal architecture yet. The company seems to have clandestinely launched a GT 1010 GPU a couple of days ago, and no one even knew about it. Search results for the GT 1010 GPU throw up few relevant results at this point. However, the GT 1010 is indicated on NVIDIA's official driver download page. So, what really is the GT 1010 and when can you get it?

The first report that a GT 1010 card actually exists came from user Dapz's YouTube video, who happened to have spotted the card's name on the NVIDIA driver download page. Dapz contacted NVIDIA customer support via live chat to which he received a response in the affirmative that such a card indeed exists. However, the rep said that the card was just announced not released. The rep neither confirmed any specifications nor could give a release date. 

TechPowerUp, however, has managed to put up the specifications of the NVIDIA GeForce GT 1010. According to the site, the GT 1010 is based on a GP108 GPU fabbed on the 14 nm process. The GP108 has a die area of 74 mm2 and is comprised of 1,800 million transistors. Essentially, the GT 1010 is the same GPU as the GT 1030 with some CUDA cores disabled. While the the GT 1030 offered 384 CUDA cores, the GT 1010 will offer only 256 (i.e. two streaming multiprocessors).

The GT 1010 supports 2 GB of GDDR5 VRAM on a 64-bit memory interface. The base clock of the GPU is 1,228 MHz and can boost up to 1,468 MHz. Additionally,  the card features 16 texture mapping units (TMUs), 16 raster operation pipelines (ROPs), and a TDP of 30 W, which means it can run on just PCIe power without the need for power connectors.

It is not yet clear whether the GT 1010 will be available for OEM systems alone or for the general public as well. While such a cut-down Pascal GPU may seem odd in 2021, NVIDIA clearly thinks otherwise and sees a potential market for it. Who knows, we may even seen a GT 1020 as well to complete the series.

Buy the Asus GeForce GT 1030 on Amazon

GT 1010 indicated on the NVIDIA driver download page. (Source: NVIDIA)
GT 1010 indicated on the NVIDIA driver download page. (Source: NVIDIA)
NVIDIA customer care response to GT 1010 availability. (Source: Dapz on YouTube)
NVIDIA customer care response to GT 1010 availability. (Source: Dapz on YouTube)
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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2021 01 > NVIDIA quietly introduces the GeForce GT 1010 — A Pascal GP108 GPU with 256 CUDA cores, 2 GB GDDR5 VRAM, and 55 W TDP
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam, 2021-01-16 (Update: 2021-01-18)
Vaidyanathan Subramaniam
I am a cell and molecular biologist and computers have been an integral part of my life ever since I laid my hands on my first PC which was based on an Intel Celeron 266 MHz processor, 16 MB RAM and a modest 2 GB hard disk. Since then, I’ve seen my passion for technology evolve with the times. From traditional floppy based storage and running DOS commands for every other task, to the connected cloud and shared social experiences we take for granted today, I consider myself fortunate to have witnessed a sea change in the technology landscape. I honestly feel that the best is yet to come, when things like AI and cloud computing mature further. When I am not out finding the next big cure for cancer, I read and write about a lot of technology related stuff or go about ripping and re-assembling PCs and laptops.