Notebookcheck

Moto G5 Plus now available for 300 Euros

Moto G5 Plus now available for 300 Euros
Moto G5 Plus now available for 300 Euros
The Moto G5 Plus is slightly larger than the standard G5 with a faster Snapdragon SoC and higher capacity internal battery.

The official Motorola online store is now offering the G5 Plus for 300 Euros or $230 USD for customers in the US. The manufacturer recently updated its line of Moto G smartphones to Android 7.0 Nougat.

The mainstream 5.2-inch Moto G5 Plus includes a robust metal case in two color choices: Lunar Gray or Fine Gold. Both NFC and a fingerprint sensor are integrated to support contact-less shopping transactions. Other features include a 12 MP rear camera with dual LED Flash, auto-focus, and large f/1.7 aperture for better nighttime photos. Internal storage space is limited to 32 GB on the entry-level SKU, but MicroSD cards of up to 128 GB are fortunately supported.

The mid-range octa-core Snapdragon 625 with integrated Adreno 506 GPU, 3 GB of RAM, 4G LTE, and 3000 mAh battery round up the list of features. Every purchase includes a "Turbo Power Charger" that promises 6 hours of use from a short 15-minute charge.

Motorola recently expanded its G5 series into additional color options and territories. Users looking for a higher-end Motorola experience should consider the Moto Z and its unique modular accessories.

Working For Notebookcheck

Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team! Indian citizens welcome!

Currently wanted: 
News and Editorial Editor - Details here

Source(s)

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2017 04 > Moto G5 Plus now available for 300 Euros
Allen Ngo, 2017-04- 5 (Update: 2017-04- 5)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.