Notebookcheck

Microsoft will let developers recompile x86-apps for better performance on Snapdragon chips

Recompiled x86 apps will be able to bypass the ARM emulation of future Windows 10 versions.
Recompiled x86 apps will be able to bypass the ARM emulation of future Windows 10 versions.
Developers of x86 applications for Windows 10 will be able to bypass ARM emulation and speed up these apps on future Snapdragon equipped Cellular PCs if they recompile them for ARM64.

Microsoft revealed last week, that it will support Windows 10 to run on future Qualcomm Snapdragon processors starting with the Snapdragon 835-SOC that is set to be released in early 2017. A future Windows 10 update will integrate an ARM-emulation layer that will allow Windows 10 and regular x86 applications like Adobe Photoshop or Microsoft Office to run on Cellular PCs that will be based on Snapdragon chips and offer LTE connectivity and a smaller footprint without the need for extensive cooling.

Last weekend we heard new reports that Microsoft plans to also integrate an ARM compiler into a future version of Visual Studio for Windows, that will allow developers of x86 applications to bypass the emulation, thereby increasing performance for the user. One twitter user and security expert going by the twitter handle @never_released already used a preview version of Visual Studio to recompile a few open source programs for the ARM64 architecture, for instance a popular app for admins called putty. The XDA developers forum added a new forum for ARM Windows apps where you can already find the recompiled version of putty and a bunch of other apps.

Quelle(n)

static version load dynamic
Loading Comments
Comment on this article
Please share our article, every link counts!
> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 12 > Microsoft will let developers recompile x86-apps for better performance on Snapdragon chips
Alexander Fagot, 2016-12-12 (Update: 2016-12-12)
Alexander Fagot
Alexander Fagot - Editor
As a former projectionist still used to working with 35 mm film and experience in computer assembling and overclocking, I was drawn to the professional IT crowd a couple of years back and started working in IT support, Windows administration and project management before discovering my love for traveling the world. Now I am working as a news editor from all parts of the world, mostly writing about gadgets and mobile gear for Notebookcheck.