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Meizu Pro 6 images show final AnTuTu score

Meizu Pro 6 images show final AnTuTu score
Meizu Pro 6 images show final AnTuTu score
Specifications and benchmark results leak just days before the official April 13 unveiling.

Not only was the HTC 10 unveiled this week, but Meizu will soon be holding a press event of its own to unveil the successor to the Pro 5 smartphone. Predictably called the Pro 6, core specifications on the device have presumably been leaked ahead of the official reveal. The rumored specifications are as follows:

  • 5.2-inch FHD AMOLED display
  • MediaTek Helio X25 SoC
  • 4 GB RAM
  • 32 GB eMMC
  • 21 MP rear w/ 10-LED ring Flash + 5 MP front cameras

Another unconfirmed feature includes Force Touch similar to the latest iPhone flagship. The smartphone may lack support for expandable storage as well. Previous rumors claimed that the device could ship with 6 GB of RAM instead of 4 GB, though this now seems unlikely unless if the Meizu is planning on multiple variants and SKUs of the Pro 6 design.

The leaked images reveal a final AnTuTu score of 91165 points. This is compared to the Xiaomi Mi 5 and Galaxy S7 with well over 130000 points each in the same benchmark. It is likely that the Chinese manufacturer will market the Pro 6 to be more affordable than competing devices from major manufacturers.

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> Notebook / Laptop Reviews and News > News > News Archive > Newsarchive 2016 04 > Meizu Pro 6 images show final AnTuTu score
Alexander Fagot/ Allen Ngo, 2016-04-12 (Update: 2016-04-12)
Allen Ngo
Allen Ngo - US Editor in Chief
After graduating with a B.S. in environmental hydrodynamics from the University of California, I studied reactor physics to become licensed by the U.S. NRC to operate nuclear reactors. There's a striking level of appreciation you gain for everyday consumer electronics after working with modern nuclear reactivity systems astonishingly powered by computers from the 80s. When I'm not managing day-to-day activities and US review articles on Notebookcheck, you can catch me following the eSports scene and the latest gaming news.